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View Full Version : YES I CARE!!!!! YOU GOT ME HEHE



IamMe77
01-21-2008, 05:34 PM
actually I do really care either way
it still will be used HD dvd in any case for other purposes if not movies.

Ultra54
01-21-2008, 06:11 PM
I don't believe it will be dropped, it will co exist with Blue Ray.

Cruel_Intentions
01-21-2008, 07:05 PM
yes, MS could publish games on HD-DVD media, but so could any other PC game/software manufacturer. Just like any other PC game/software manufacturer could produce Blu-ray discs for use

filthy
01-21-2008, 08:13 PM
DVD+R/RW and DVD-R/RW have both been around and are both staying, as will HD-DVD abd Blu-Ray.

tired-n-cranky
01-22-2008, 12:06 AM
Can we say Beta vcr tapes?

opinionated
01-23-2008, 09:00 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LoveToSing77</div><div class="ubbcode-body">if MICROSOFT BACKS UP HD DVD IT CANT BE DROPPED
they could start using HD DVD FOR PC GAMES ETC AND MAKE EXCLUSIVE USE OF HD DVD ROM FOR COMPUTERS.</div></div>

why are you yelling??? yeesh. you must work for microsoft :P

Hans
01-23-2008, 09:11 PM
It will be dropped for the simple reason that there can only be one format for economical reasons.
There's no way a rental or retail store is going to stock movies in 2 different formats. It's not cost effective, will cause many customer issues, and is just not a viable business model.

Maryms
01-24-2008, 09:16 AM
HD will be dropped sooner then later.

AmdWolfman
01-24-2008, 09:30 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Hans</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It will be dropped for the simple reason that there can only be one format for economical reasons.
There's no way a rental or retail store is going to stock movies in 2 different formats. It's not cost effective, will cause many customer issues, and is just not a viable business model. </div></div>



I agree with hans with this one.

Koss
01-24-2008, 11:18 AM
with Apple TV here and Media Centre Extenders from D-Link and Lynksys that play codex's like Divx, along with the fact that hard drive and flash drive space is getting cheaper by the second, I really can't see the need to buy a Blu Ray or HD-DVD player. Physical storage and playback is so last century.

filthy
01-24-2008, 12:59 PM
Not everyone has a media center PC, some can only handle a TV and DVD player and even then still struggle...lol.

I have a PC with a Core 2 Duo E6600, 4GB RAM and an Radeon HD 2600 for a media PC, hooked up to a 52" LCD and an XBOX 360 in the mix and enjoy all that it can do, but even still movie time is just the LCD and an HDMI system.

IamMe77
01-24-2008, 02:41 PM
I know holographic media will replace most in future but who knows when is the question

IamMe77
01-24-2008, 02:52 PM
well holographic media is way above what were using now even hard drives that were using is so last century but we use em anyway

Killswitch
01-24-2008, 04:18 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Hans</div><div class="ubbcode-body">It will be dropped for the simple reason that there can only be one format for economical reasons.
There's no way a rental or retail store is going to stock movies in 2 different formats. It's not cost effective, will cause many customer issues, and is just not a viable business model. </div></div>
Kind of like the days when there was Beta and VHS. One disappeared, and the other hung around for a VERY long time.

Killswitch
01-24-2008, 05:48 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LoveToSing77</div><div class="ubbcode-body">......even hard drives that were using is so last century but we use em anyway </div></div>
There were hard drives one hundred years ago? /ubbthreads/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/crazy.gif

Koss
01-24-2008, 06:23 PM
A century (From the Latin cent, one hundred) is one hundred consecutive years.

* In all dating systems, centuries are essentially numbered ordinally, and not cardinally. Thus, the first century of a time frame is "The First Century" and not "Century 1", "The Second Century" and not "Century 2", and so on.

If we agree that we are in the 21st Century and the last century was not one hundred years ago, but rather ended in the year 2000. This 21st century began on January 1st 2001.

I might have a betamax tape kicking around that explains this better.

cybolynx
01-24-2008, 07:26 PM
almost a century ... http://www.techeblog.com/index.php/tech-gadget/worlds-first-hard-drive-1956

only another what ... 42 years ...

Killswitch
01-24-2008, 07:41 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Koss</div><div class="ubbcode-body">A century (From the Latin cent, one hundred) is one hundred consecutive years.

* In all dating systems, centuries are essentially numbered ordinally, and not cardinally. Thus, the first century of a time frame is "The First Century" and not "Century 1", "The Second Century" and not "Century 2", and so on.

If we agree that we are in the 21st Century and the last century was not one hundred years ago, but rather ended in the year 2000. This 21st century began on January 1st 2001.

I might have a betamax tape kicking around that explains this better.
</div></div>
I know what he meant. I was just joking around.

IamMe77
01-25-2008, 02:44 AM
beta never disapeared actually used in professional studios over vhs tape smaller better quality and probaly made to last longer I should know since I graduated from FANSHAWE COLLEGE audio visual and multimedia tech program and I worked temp at a studio where they used BETA tape.

Ultra54
01-25-2008, 07:11 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">HD will be dropped sooner then later. </div></div>
Lol....like when is sooner, a week, a year, 5years?Can you be a little more specific or care to stick your neck out a little more?

Maryms
01-25-2008, 08:28 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Ultra54</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">HD will be dropped sooner then later. </div></div>
Lol....like when is sooner, a week, a year, 5years?Can you be a little more specific or care to stick your neck out a little more?</div></div>

I would suspect with in a year 2009 that HD-DVD will be almost a thing of the past for movies, but as for game consles MS (that is) they may continue the HD-DVD format for their consoles just out of spite for not using a sony based technology Blue-Ray.

Hans
01-25-2008, 11:09 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LoveToSing77</div><div class="ubbcode-body">beta never disapeared actually used in professional studios over vhs tape smaller better quality and probaly made to last longer I should know since I graduated from FANSHAWE COLLEGE audio visual and multimedia tech program and I worked temp at a studio where they used BETA tape. </div></div>

They do not use Betamax or VHS in professional studios...

filthy
01-25-2008, 01:22 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LoveToSing77</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> I graduated from FANSHAWE COLLEGE audio visual program </div></div>

You were in the AV club! That explains a lot....lol.

IamMe77
01-25-2008, 04:32 PM
yep they did use past tense may still use some places yep
they still use older stuff when they can at least as a backup measure if needed but back in 96 they sure did thats around the time I was at FANSHAWE your right it explains why im so into av stuff computers etc. hehe

sniderscott2
01-26-2008, 12:45 AM
I LIKE FRUIT! AND THERE SEEMS TO BE ONE HIDDEN IN THESE POSTS

shadowjak
01-26-2008, 12:05 PM
A short(cough cough) history of storage media

1877 - Edison invents the cylinder "phonograph" used to record and playback sound. Originally thought to be useful as a business machine for dictation (like the dictaphone which would come later.) Other uses: recordings of plays pre-dating Radio Drama nearly 50 years.

1887 - Emile Berliner invents the flat record player ("gramophone") using acoustic horn and licenses technology to record companies who make "70-rpm" disks

1897 - Shellac gramophone disks developed by Emile Berliner - speeds will vary on discs issued by companies in different countries (80 rpm was used on some British recordings)

1906 - RCA Victor's "Victrola" model record player is introduced. It has a variable turntable speed control to accomodate the wide range of phonograph records produced at that time; Victor's speeds ranged from 71 - 76 rpm. Columbia was producing discs as 80rpm.Some British disks even rotated between 66rpm - 90rpm; Although U.S. phonograph manufacturers agreed in 1928 to standardize on the rate of 78.26 rpm, it still took decades for more standard speeds to be used worldwide.

1912 - Disk recordings overtake cylinders in the popular market. Columbia drops cylinders.

1913 - Edison Co. finally introduces a disk player, now that the cylinder market is gone

1926 - Bell Laboratories develops a 33 1/3 rpm disk system to synchronize a music track for the Warner Brothers film "Don Juan" containing music composed by William Axt. This system is similar to the Vitaphone system introduced months earlier. Both competing systems -- the "Vitaphone system" and the "Bell/Warner Bros. system", as well as the use of transcription discs by radio stations/networks, inspire the introduction of 33rpm disks later -- a "long-playing" record intended for home use but eventually with smaller "micro" grooves in the disc and a smaller size (10-inches.)

1932 - RCA laboratories work on a 33 1/3 rpm record system, but the system fails because the material does not stand up to repeated plays. Sixteen more years will pass before a system of "long-playing" records is developed that is good enough for widespread consumer use, delayed in part by World War II materials shortages.

1933-35 - Echophon company, another licensee of the Stille patents, develops the Textophon, a dictation machine using steel wire. Echophon is later purchased by ITT and made part of the subsidiary firm C. Lorenz, a manufacturer of telephone equipment. C. Lorenz, with the help of engineer Semi J. Begun, later markets a steel tape recorder that finds wide use in European telephone authorities for telephone recording purposes and by German radio networks for mobile recording.

1935 - AEG/Telefunken exhibits the first magnetic tape recorder in Germany.

1948 - The commercial 33 1/3 LP (Long Playing) microgroove (1-mil) disc is introduced by Dr.Peter Goldmark of Columbia Records; the first LP disk is released; it is 10" Columbia record #4001 performed by classical violinist Yehudi Menuhin.

1949-Three former Armour Research Foundations employees start Magnecord Corporation in Chicago to make a high quality wire recorder. Plans for the wire recorder are soon dropped, and the group in 1949 introduces a tape recorder, the PT-6. The corporate life of Magnecord ends in 1957 when it is purchased by Midwestern Instruments, Inc.

1949 - RCA Victor responds to the LP by developing large-hole 45 rpm phonograph records;Although the effort failed to kill LPs, RCA's 45s eventually had the unintended consequence of replacing 78s as the preferred media format for singles.

1952- world's first computer tape shipped to IBM for use with IBM 726 tape drive

1953 - The first pre-recorded reel-to-reel tape (at 7 1/2 ips) is offered for sale.

1955 - Larger 12" LP's overtake 10" LP's as the preferred size for long-playing records.

1956-The first practical professional videotape machines were the Quad machines introduced by Ampex in the United States.

1958-The RCA Victor tape cartridge (also known as the Magazine Loading Cartridge and Sound Tape)was introduced.It was a magnetic tape format designed to offer stereo quarter-inch reel-to-reel tape in a more convenient format for the home market.Despite its convenience, and a design that would later be echoed in that of the much smaller Compact Cassette, the format was not a success. RCA was slow to produce machines and to license recorded music, and the format disappeared from the market by the early 1960s.

1963 - Compact stereo tape cassettes and players are developed by Phillips.

1964 - The 8-track stereo tape cartridge is developed for automobile use by Lear

1965- A 1 inch type A (designated Type A by SMPTE)an open-reel helical scan videotape format is developed by Ampex.

1969-Laserdisc technology, using a transparent disc, was invented by David Paul Gregg in 1958 (and patented in 1961 and 1969). By 1969 Philips had developed a videodisc in reflective mode, which has great advantages over the transparent mode. MCA and Philips decided to join their efforts. They first publicly demonstrated the videodisc in 1972. LD was first available on the market, in Atlanta, on December 15, 1978, two years after the VHS VCR and four years before the CD, which is based on laserdisc technology. Philips produced the players and MCA the discs.

1969-The Microcassette an audio storage medium is introduced by Olympus

1971-The first 1/4" computer cartridge is introduced

1975 - Sony introduces the Betamax home video system. By using a convenient cartridge and offering the product at a low cost, Beta quickly takes off.

1976-Elcaset was a short-lived audio format created by Sony.At that time, it was widely felt that the compact cassette was never likely to be capable of the same levels of performance that was available from reel-to-reel systems, yet clearly the cassette had great advantages in terms of convenience. The Elcaset system was intended to marry the performance of reel to reel with cassette convenience. The name "Elcaset" may simply mean L-cassette, or large cassette.

1976- Panasonic and JVC introduce a competitor to Betamax, the Video Home System ( VHS ) system.

1976-A 1 inch type B VTR (designated Type B by SMPTE)an open-reel videotape format is developed by the Bosch Fernseh devision of Bosch in Germany.

1976-A 1 inch Type C (designated Type C by SMPTE) professional helical scan open-reel videotape format is co-developed and introduced by Ampex and Sony.

1982-The first high density 5.25" computer diskette is made available

1982 - The digital Compact Disc (CD) is introduced by a Japanese conglomerate.

1982- two events happened that eventually led to the home camcorder boom: JVC introduced the VHS-C format, and Sony released the first professional camcorder named Betacam. VHS-C was essentially VHS with a reduced-size cassette that had been designed for portable VCRs. Sony's Betacam was a standard developed for professional camcorders,

1983- Sony releases the Betamax-based Betamovie, the first consumer camcorder.Within a short time JVC released its own camcorder using its pre-existing VHS-C format.

1984- 3.5" computer diskettes are introduced

1984 - Sales of recorded compact cassettes (audio cassettes) exceed LP sales for the first time.

1985-The first commercial re-writeable magneto-optical disc is demonstrated and commercial CD-ROM media is introduced

1985 - Adoption of the CD starts taking a huge bite out of LP sales, causing them to drop 25%.

1985- Sony introduces its new video camcorder, the CCD-V8, on January 8, 1985.

1986-CD Video (also known as CDV, CD-V, or CD+V) was introduced it combined the technologies of compact disc and laserdisc.---I actually had one of these movies

1986 - The Recording Industry Association of America (the RIAA) announces on June 19 that CDs have overtaken LP sales in the U.S.

1988 - The CD overtakes LP sales worldwide; CD-ROMs are developed as a computer medium able to store around 750 MegaBytes per disc.

1990 - Phillips introduces a digital audio tape recorder (DAT) using a digital casette.

1996 - The DVD (Digital Versatile Disc) increases capacity of digital storage of audio and video on a CD (Compact Disc) medium; can store on to 4.7 GigaBytes per side; double-sided disks are possible though rare...

1999-Sony introduces the Digital8 (D8) video format camcorder

1999 - Recordable CD-R digital audio disc technology becomes part of personal computer systems.

2000 - Consumer DVD recorders were introduced at the Comdex Consumer Electronics show in Las Vegas priced at $1000, but by the 2001 show came down to around $500;these video recorders can hold up to 4.7 gigabytes of video and multimedia content

2001 - DVD video disk players outsell VHS video cassette recorder/players for the first time.

2001 - Music DVD's are introduced which can contain 7 - 10 times the amount of music, or multimedia content to augment the usual sound recordings.

2001 to present-MiniDVDs and UMDs are introduced. DVD-R and DVD-RW---DVD+R and DVD+RW---DVD+R DL---DVD-R DL--- DVD-RAM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blu-ray_Disc

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hddvd

On the horizon-Holographic Versatile Disc (HVD) is an optical disc technology which would hold up to 3.9 terabytes (TB) of information. It employs a technique known as collinear holography, whereby two lasers, one red and one green, are collimated in a single beam. The green laser reads data encoded as laser interference fringes from a holographic layer near the top of the disc while the red laser is used as the reference beam and to read servo information from a regular CD-style aluminum layer near the bottom. Servo information is used to monitor the position of the read head over the disc, similar to the head, track, and sector information on a conventional hard disk drive. On a CD or DVD this servo information is interspersed amongst the data.

HVD is not the only technology in high-capacity, optical storage media. InPhase Technologies is developing a rival holographic format called Tapestry Media, which they claim will eventually store 1.6 TB with a data transfer rate of 120 MB/s, and several companies are developing TB-level discs based on 3D optical data storage technology. Such large optical storage capacities compete favorably with both HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc. However, holographic drives are projected to initially cost around US$15,000, and a single disc around US$120180, although prices are expected to fall steadily.[4] The market for this format is not initially the common consumer, but enterprises with very large storage needs.

3D optical data storage is the term given to any form of optical data storage in which information can be recorded and/or read with three dimensional resolution (as opposed to the two dimensional resolution afforded, for example, by CD).[1][2]

This innovation has the potential to provide terabyte-level mass storage on DVD-sized disks. Data recording and readback are achieved by focusing lasers within the medium. However, because of the volumetric nature of the data structure, the laser light must travel through other data points before it reaches the point where reading or recording is desired. Therefore, nonlinear technology is required to ensure that these other data points do not interfere with the addressing of the desired point.

No commercial product based on 3D optical data storage has yet arrived on the mass market, although several companies are actively developing the technology and predict that it will become available by 2010.

3D optical data storage has been in use since June of 1997 in the non consumer sector.

No format lives forever there will always be something new coming up

Hans
01-27-2008, 01:54 PM
There's 1 format that defeats them all, and is here to stay : the human brain. Lol

IamMe77
01-27-2008, 03:51 PM
you know what if we continue to use formats then there still used by us and thats all that matters really people still use commodore 64s and pets amigas etc older apple computers and all kinds of older tech. guess what it still works. so unless you drop it it will never be dropped. Unless it stops working never is a long time. not forever.

opinionated
02-01-2008, 10:16 AM
You make no sense.

Hans
02-01-2008, 02:56 PM
Maybe a few well placed "." could make it a little easier to read...

cybolynx
02-01-2008, 03:29 PM
divx sucks ... just like the mp3 format ...

re encoding somehting into another format looses quality ... as with converting analog to digital and vise versa ...

only thing is some people wont notice it ... and some will easily ...

henc why some people can use a walmart surround system for 40 bux and really enjoy it ...

and some need a 20'000 dollar system to enjoy the same material ...

i guess it just comes down to preferance and what makes you happy ...

persoanly ... hd or blueray is usless, unless you have a tv capable of displaying it to its fullest potential...
OR it replaces all dvd players and movies that are on the market ... alot of the market dont need it dont want it dont care for it ... lol

its only when cable, satalight, and off air brodcasts become HD 100% all the time and you cant buy nothing but HD tvs will HD become standard ...

Maryms
02-01-2008, 05:22 PM
There will be a new format in 2 years from now which will replace Blue-Ray.