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View Full Version : Any Queen E \school parents?



kinkysquiggles
08-11-2008, 12:34 AM
???

Muffin
08-11-2008, 08:03 AM
my kids go there.

Tash
08-11-2008, 03:31 PM
?

chase_me
08-11-2008, 04:36 PM
is there a point to your question?

KelBear
08-11-2008, 06:03 PM
I am one.. whats up?

Kittie
08-11-2008, 06:19 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Chase_Me</div><div class="ubbcode-body">is there a point to your question?</div></div>

rude much?

IMHO
08-11-2008, 06:37 PM
What the ,,,,

kinkysquiggles
08-11-2008, 10:01 PM
I had to make my questions short, little ones were going crazy.

What grades are your children in?

Are they splitting every grade still?

Do you like the school?

DO you ever wish you put your children in french immersion?

Madmax
08-11-2008, 11:15 PM
I not like Q E and no never would i put any child in french emmersion .... why ... cause i don't believe in forcing a child to learn a language they ain't born with.

If later in life they choose to do so then so be it.

So send you kid(s) to Riverview Public School ... something about that name needs to be changed as i not want my kid going to riverview ever... /ubbthreads/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/smile.gif

Babzz
08-11-2008, 11:28 PM
My son was in french emmersion until grade 4. I loved the school!! When we moved here from elliot lake we tried to the emmersion here for one year and my son was behind a lot of hours so I had to sadly pull him out and into an all english school. His teacher at rosedale was amazing and she is the one who figured out he was behind in hours.. both algoma district so you would think they had the same amount of french. sadly it was not that way.

I would highly recommend the emmersion program for any child though!! They are little spongues and pick up the french very fast

bluekrissyspikes
08-11-2008, 11:43 PM
putting your child in french emersion increases their iq and helps wire the brain to learn more quickly. my kids will be put into it if they can handle it. there are different levels of french emmersion. some are only an hour a day and claim to be french emmersion, others are half day.

Muffin
08-12-2008, 08:11 AM
I dont mind Queen E. my kids had great teachers. Last I heard split grades were still the plan, I am not too happy about that, just becuase of of the grades has a few too many students. I think if enough of us complain, like last year, we will get single grades. Makes life easier for the teachers and the kids that way.

b&aMom
08-12-2008, 10:10 AM
My kids go to River View, and they suffer from a lot of split classes, as well. You have to realize that the school will get a certain number of teachers based on the number of students. When there aren't enough students to warrant a teacher for each grade, then you get split classes. Until they close more elementary schools, many of us will just have to live with split classes.

I find it kinda' freaky, because in my elementary school in Goulais, we had two classes for each grade. Student population has dropped substantially, and they're still trying to catch the system/buildings up.

CrowellPhotographs
08-12-2008, 05:06 PM
I have to suggest french immersion. I went thru french from grade school until I graduated H.S.
It's 100times easier to learn as a child than it is as an adult. The brain just doesn't learn that way anymore.
The other thing is that, yup, maybe you don't need it to get a job here in the Soo. But how many kids end up staying here to work? Almost anywhere else now, it's either french or bust... or.... knowing french will make it a joke to find a GOOD, WELL PAYED job even in a tough job market.
Now, Gov. jobs are almost impossible to get without french. Also, on most interview evaluations, french knowledge is worth a ton of points. More than an extra year of relevant experience in some cases.

Tutones
08-12-2008, 05:43 PM
Split grades can actually be very beneficial to the students and are actually preferred in many school boards. The trick is flagging the kids to make sure they are placed properly. The younger grade should always contain students who are capable of working ahead or are already ahead of their class, while the upper grade should consiste of students who need remedial help and review of last years work in order to succeed. While the teacher must do more work & preparation with a split class, the students have better learning opportunities in a split grade classroom.

As for French Immersion raising the IQ - I sincerely doubt it. it just seems to appear that way because the ones who can't cut it are weeded out of the system early so only the smarter students continue through.

IQ is pretty much set at birth through genetics and whether a kid works to their full potential is largely dependent on how much the parents are involved in the child's education. Parents who care enough to choose French Immersionor any type of enhanced learning opportunity for their children, are typically VERY involved parents throughout the child's life.

nightingale
08-13-2008, 02:47 AM
Very good Post Mrs.WhoMe. And you are right, French Immersion does not raise IQ.

b&aMom
08-13-2008, 09:16 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Mrs.Who?Me?</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
As for French Immersion raising the IQ - I sincerely doubt it. it just seems to appear that way because the ones who can't cut it are weeded out of the system early so only the smarter students continue through.</div></div>

I would agree. I know someone who put their child into French Immersion in another school district, and by third grade the child was illiterate in TWO languages. She had no clue how to read or write in either. On the other hand, my sister in law attended French Immersion in BC for a few years, and is a university grad. She may not have stayed in the program, but it wasn't for lack of IQ.

Muse
08-13-2008, 10:16 AM
While I agree that putting a child in French Immersion is a choice that parents have a right to make, I've run into a fair amount of parents who don't put their kids in because they don't like French, or they think their kids don't need French.

The truth of it is, there are a lot of frustrated just-out-of high school students who have to try to learn this whole new language they've never been exposed to in college or university, because they want to move somewhere like Ottawa, where you'll have one hell of a time finding employment anywhere if you aren't fluent in French.

Canada is a bi-lingual country. This is something that seems to get lost in the cracks here in SSM, because it's very very anglophone. A fact I've always found interesting, because all the surrounding areas are very francophone.

To get a gov't job, or to work in many many places in Canada, being bi-lingual (in French and English) is necessary, and wherever it isn't necessary it gives you a distinct advantage over the competition.

There isn't an overwhelming amount of children who are incapable of picking up a second language as young as 4. It doesn't happen as often as many people seem to think, and most often only to children with other learning disabilities. And as long as a parent is attentive and in contact with the school, it doesn't take long to realize a child will not thrive in that environment and no real time will be lost education-wise.

I know there are people who succeed without speaking a word of French, and that's great. But generally speaking it gives you that extra advantage in life, and should be something to consider when trying to decide if your (as in the general you, not specific) child should or shouldn't go to French Immersion.

/soapbox

b&aMom
08-13-2008, 10:53 AM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Muse</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
Canada is a bi-lingual country. This is something that seems to get lost in the cracks here in SSM, because it's very very anglophone. A fact I've always found interesting, because all the surrounding areas are very francophone.</div></div>

I have to very strongly disagree with these statements. I have grown up here, lived in Toronto, another southern Ontario city, and BC. Starting with BC: forget hearing any French in BC. When I was there in the 90s, there was no provincial government requirement be bilingual to get a job in the government.

Moving on to southern Ontario and Toronto: they speak highly of being bilingual, but they are truly only interested in English. They're too busy teaching ESL to so many students that, while French is a part of the school curriculum, ENGLISH is where the emphasis is.

I find the fact that you think the Sault is very anglophone pretty funny when looking at my experience in other parts of the country. Have you lived elsewhere? French isn't even on their radar.

Also, I don't buy this thing about having to learn it so early. I was in school in the 70s when French became a required part of the curriculum. I was taught French in grades 6, 7 & 8. Each year I received grades in the mid to upper 90s. In high school I took it in grades 9 & 10, receiving similar grades. Because I was never in need of using that language, I lost a good portion of that knowledge. In university, almost 10 years later, I pulled 90s in my first year latin class. You are either good with languages, or your not. While it may be a bit easier to learn another language when you are younger, it's not that hard to do it when you're older. My university linguistics class taught me that it's important to learn pronunciation by age 4, so that the tongue can properly make the sounds. Pronunciation is but a small part of learning a language, it doesn't mean you have great difficulty as you age.

Muse
08-13-2008, 01:01 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: b&aMom</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
I find the fact that you think the Sault is very anglophone pretty funny when looking at my experience in other parts of the country. Have you lived elsewhere? French isn't even on their radar.

Also, I don't buy this thing about having to learn it so early. I was in school in the 70s when French became a required part of the curriculum. I was taught French in grades 6, 7 & 8. Each year I received grades in the mid to upper 90s. In high school I took it in grades 9 & 10, receiving similar grades. Because I was never in need of using that language, I lost a good portion of that knowledge. In university, almost 10 years later, I pulled 90s in my first year latin class. You are either good with languages, or your not. While it may be a bit easier to learn another language when you are younger, it's not that hard to do it when you're older. My university linguistics class taught me that it's important to learn pronunciation by age 4, so that the tongue can properly make the sounds. Pronunciation is but a small part of learning a language, it doesn't mean you have great difficulty as you age. </div></div>

Yes, I have lived in both northern (well... further north) and southern ontario, each for a number of years, and I don't find what I'm saying to be funny at all. This is the only place I've lived or travelled (both in and out of Ontario) to where I *had* to speak English on a regular basis, because in day to day life running errands or going to work/school, hardly anybody speaks French.I remember having to go to the ER the first year I was here, there wasn't even someone at triage who could studder out anything that resembled French. I rarely spoke a word of it at all outside of school until I moved to the Soo.

There are areas in BC that speak French, my aunt visits twice a year. Smaller towns, I forget the area now, I haven't spoken to her in a while. Another aunt of mine works out of Calgary, and she was told she got the job because she was the only bi-lingual applicant.

I never said anybody HAD to learn a second language by age 4. I said it was advantageous to start doing so at a younger age and that it's something to consider when choosing your child's first school, since the OP mentioned French Immersion.

I also never said the job market was closed to people who can only speak English. Again, speaking both languages gives people an advantage, and lets them apply for jobs where it's required.

I'll say it again, putting children in French Immersion is a CHOICE for the parents to make, and the hope is that it's an educated choice, and not simply overlooked.

CrowellPhotographs
08-13-2008, 01:25 PM
I've got to agree with Muse. In the 90s it was much more lax, but in recent years there has been a huge crackdown on mandatory french within the government and beyond.
In many government departments now, there are even Upper management that have had their careers frozen until they can learn french. This is a very common occurence now. They do offer internal courses, but readily admit that it is MUCH more difficult as an adult. Currently it may not be impossible to get a government job as an english only speaker, but there are very few positions now and understandably a lot of competition. English only is certainly being phased out.
Also, in many of the communities you mentioned, it may not be the ABSOLUTE requirement, but it is so much easier to get a job when you are. You also get paid a lot more. It's almost the pay scale equivalent of having a masters.

As for the debate that the Sault is no more English exclusive as anywhere else in this country, you do realize that Sault Ste. Marie is the ONLY non-bilingual city/town in all of Canada. I believe it was in the early 90s, our redneck council actually felt the need to pass a bill to make it official. That has been a black eye for the Soo ever since. Despite all the press about quebec language police, it certainly is french first but still bilingual.

dancingqueen
08-13-2008, 01:30 PM
learning a second language is something that is easier to be done at a young age, it is a well know fact.
In Canada (being a bi-lingual country) it is a much better advantage to be bi-lingual. It looks better as far as jobs are concerned. But, I don't have kids, so what do I know?

Verotik
08-13-2008, 01:31 PM
<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: bluekrissyspikes</div><div class="ubbcode-body">putting your child in french emersion increases their iq and helps wire the brain to learn more quickly. my kids will be put into it if they can handle it. there are different levels of french emmersion. some are only an hour a day and claim to be french emmersion, others are half day. </div></div>


lol going to french emersion does not increase your child's IQ what a joke, it does give them a step up later in live if they want to work for the government since due to all the [censored] kissing every job has to be bilingual except the ones in quebec