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General Lee
01-09-2009, 07:28 AM
Going to be buying a fusion bass tube soon and was wondering if i needed a power cap or will i be ok?

starterwiz
01-09-2009, 08:08 AM
NO!!!
Caps are the biggest rip-off in the car audio industry.
Do NOT take advice from anyone that suggests a cap for your car audio system. If they think a cap is a good idea, they have no real understanding of 12 volt.
A capacitor works as a filter to slow the change of voltage during surges. Note the word slow! They will help to keep the voltage up for a few miliseconds, but they will also keep the voltage down just as long once empty, and just add another load on your alternator.

A better way to spend your money would be to upgrade your "Big Three" wires under the hood.
That means the alternaator to battery, battery to ground, and alternator ground to chassis ground.
In the case of the bass tubes, the current needed is only 15 amps, and will not affect your charging system.

A cap that makes an improvement in the sound is acting as a bandaid for a poor power supply circuit, and may make the initial snap of a drum beat a tiny bit better on some very loosely regulated amps. The only real improvement 'tho will be the slowing of the flickering lights that dim during heavy bass notes. Again the word "slow". The lights will still dim, just not as rapidly, and they will stay dim longer as the alternator charges the cap.

Spl measurments will be considerably lower if you add caps to a competition system.

General Lee
01-09-2009, 08:19 AM
Thanks starterwiz so no need to upgrade anything i use to have a full alpine system in my eagle talon and i replaced my altanator 2 times so i just wanna make sure i do not mess up anything again i do not what to have to keep replacing stuff just to have a thump

starterwiz
01-09-2009, 08:26 AM
No...you just need to make sure that you have a decent battery, and all the connections are clean and tight. The bass tubes use just a bit more power than the average deck, but they are incredibly efficient, so produce copius amounts of bass with very little current. No "free lunch"...just a good design.

General Lee
01-09-2009, 09:06 AM
one of these days i am going to stop by so i can see what they sound like in my truck i just do not feel like ripping the deck out to get to the pre outs

starterwiz
01-09-2009, 09:34 AM
we can hook it up to the speaker outs of my display board and put your deck on the same station. Won't sound as good as playing a CD using real pre-outs, but it'll give you a good sense of what it can do.

corn316
01-09-2009, 10:19 PM
just remember to use heavy wire when hooking up ur amp or u better put fire and theft on ur car insurance i have seen a hack job come from one of the dealers where they hooked the amps up to the ignition wires fire hazzered watting to happen thank god i found that problem before putting in the new amp for a friend

General Lee
01-09-2009, 10:32 PM
just remember to use heavy wire when hooking up ur amp or u better put fire and theft on ur car insurance i have seen a hack job come from one of the dealers where they hooked the amps up to the ignition wires fire hazzered watting to happen thank god i found that problem before putting in the new amp for a friend

Wow i am glad i have more sense then that lol

DodgeBoy
01-28-2009, 01:54 AM
A capacitor in my opinion is not such a bad idea, providing that the capacitor is a good fit for the craw that you are going to put on it. I would not say that they are a rip off, and I would not say that it is going to add any more stress to the charging system. I have ran one of the largest systems in the Soo before, and I will tell you that a 1 farad cap did almost nothing, but a 25 farad cap did wonders. It is all about application, good understanding, and good understading.

starterwiz
01-31-2009, 09:29 PM
A big cap will make a poorly installed system appear to perform better. They are an easy sell, quick to install, and have good margin (profit). Most amps today have more than enough caps in them, and have tightly regulated outputs and do not need further capacitance.
A 0.5 Farad cap installed on the headlight circuit of the vehicle will stop the dimming of the lights, but if the alternator isn't getting it's current to the amp without a voltage drop, it means the system isn't wired properly.

Not to be rude, but I don't beleive there are any installers in the Sault that fully understand the concept, other than the ones I have trained. I have been here for 8 years, and I have yet to see a properly wired system from any other shops, including the ones that are no longer.
I choke when I see a really pretty install, with $5/ft wire, feeding 120 amps worth of fuses in the trunk, all fed through an 80 amp glass fuse at the battery, in a fuse holder that couldn't pass 40 amps on a good day, and grounded back to the battery with the stock 10 gauge battery gound. Of course there is a cap between the amps on those ones, just because the customer had an extra $150 to spend to "fix" the bad job that was done in the first place.

If it took 25 Farads to see an improvement DodgeBoy, I can promise you that your system wasn't properly installed.

Barry Morris
01-31-2009, 10:05 PM
I'm just curious, Starterwiz. That's a lot of amps to run in a hot wire to the trunk. Do you ever use relays at the battery end??

starterwiz
02-01-2009, 11:01 AM
No relays or anything with contacts like circuit breakers. ANL fuses are bolted into the holder, and hold up fairly well. AGU glass fuses that come with most of the amp kits are cheap, but are really only good enough for low power applications.
It doesn't take much resistance to cause a huge drop when you're over 100 amps with 12 volts. Even 0ga wire will lose 1/2V at the trunk under load.

cutie22
02-09-2009, 10:41 AM
A big cap will make a poorly installed system appear to perform better. They are an easy sell, quick to install, and have good margin (profit). Most amps today have more than enough caps in them, and have tightly regulated outputs and do not need further capacitance.
A 0.5 Farad cap installed on the headlight circuit of the vehicle will stop the dimming of the lights, but if the alternator isn't getting it's current to the amp without a voltage drop, it means the system isn't wired properly.

Not to be rude, but I don't beleive there are any installers in the Sault that fully understand the concept, other than the ones I have trained. I have been here for 8 years, and I have yet to see a properly wired system from any other shops, including the ones that are no longer.
I choke when I see a really pretty install, with $5/ft wire, feeding 120 amps worth of fuses in the trunk, all fed through an 80 amp glass fuse at the battery, in a fuse holder that couldn't pass 40 amps on a good day, and grounded back to the battery with the stock 10 gauge battery gound. Of course there is a cap between the amps on those ones, just because the customer had an extra $150 to spend to "fix" the bad job that was done in the first place.

If it took 25 Farads to see an improvement DodgeBoy, I can promise you that your system wasn't properly installed.

Well, I had installed the system, used 0 gauge all the way. I ran three huge amps, two sets of components, and 4 12 inch subs. I used a 200 amp breaker under the hood, monster cables, and very high end distribution. It would not take 25 farad to make a difference, but it came to me at a great price so I used it. was just making a point. I have done several installs so I know where you are coming from as well. :)

OOPS I posted this under my girls name, this is a Dodgeboy Post. LOL