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NewCasa
01-03-2010, 12:17 PM
Trying to install a Radeon 4870 card on a Gigabyte GA-MA790XT-UD49 motherboard. I have a 2 year old Samsung LCD so I'm using the DVI-I to D-Sub (15-pin) adapter. I have tried the monitor on both plugs on the card with the same results.

Inside, I have the card plugged in to the PCI express 16x slot and I have both PCI power cables plugged in to the card. I have swapped out the cables and run them from other connectors on the power supply. My power supply is an Antec Neo (new) 750w.

This is a new build, so I have not connected any drives yet as I want to make sure my video card is operating first with no other possible sources of error other than motherboard, power supply and video.

When I turn on the computer, I get an initial beep, the (extremely loud!) fan on the graphics card comes on, but then the fan begins cycling - slows down, speeds up, slows down, etc. Also, there are four red lights on the back of the card which blink and the card itself beeps about every 10 seconds or so. I know that the screen is seeing the card because I'm not getting the 'check cable signal' message, however I'm getting no characters on the screen so I would assume that the card does not see the monitor.

Can anyone help me with this problem? Any hints? I will say I am new to this generation of technology and, at first I didn't know about the need for two power plugs on the graphics card or the additional 12v connector on the motherboard. I've dealt with them not, but still having trouble.

Thanks

filthy
01-03-2010, 02:00 PM
It can be tricky to troubleshoot, many possibilities. I think the next best step is to isolate the 4870 as the issue by using another PCIe video card in its place, if it works it's likely the 4870 is not working.

Not sure if you have another card, but hopefully you have a friend who does and will let you borrow it to try. I'm guessing your motherboard does not have onboard video, and that your using that 4870 in the top (closest to CPU) graphics slot.

NewCasa
01-03-2010, 02:45 PM
It can be tricky to troubleshoot, many possibilities. I think the next best step is to isolate the 4870 as the issue by using another PCIe video card in its place, if it works it's likely the 4870 is not working.

Not sure if you have another card, but hopefully you have a friend who does and will let you borrow it to try. I'm guessing your motherboard does not have onboard video, and that your using that 4870 in the top (closest to CPU) graphics slot.

I'm using the PCI Express 16 slot, yes. I've checked the manuals and that is the correct one. No onboard video on the motherboard. Pretty much all my friends have laptops so I doubt I'm going to find anything to borrow. That said, a friend has offered to troubleshoot it at his place so hopefully things will get sorted out.

mboy67
01-03-2010, 03:15 PM
this is one of them things you need other parts to sometimes figure it out. I you still need help I have the stuff.

Hans
01-03-2010, 04:53 PM
HD4870 LEDs

D1601 - Red LED On, shows critical temperature fault

D1602 - Red LED On, shows External power connector A was removed

D1603 - Red LED On, shows External power connector B was removed

D601 - Red LED On, shows critical Core power fault


At BOOT/POST, the card's fan will spin @ 100% for a short while and 3 of the 4 LEDs will light up for a brief period and then go out ( D601 should remain unlit ). This is NORMAL behaviour as the card is performing it's own type of POST test.

It sounds to me like your video card does not want to perform a proper POST.

A couple of things you could do :

- Take the card out and put it back in to ensure it's seated properly.
- Use regular 12V connectors with the conversion plugs to ensure your PCI power cables are not an issue.
- Try a different Power Supply.

I also noticed you said you did not know at first about the 2 extra power plugs required for the card.
Did you boot up initially without those connected?
If so, you more than likely have a faulty card now... I would not tell them that though if you RMA it.

Since 2 out of those 4 LED's indicate no power at the 2 pci connectors, I would look at the PSU first. If you have power to your regular 12V devices like a HDD and dvd, use option 2.

Upper Decker
01-03-2010, 06:07 PM
thats exactly what i was thinking. ATI cards love to screech too when they dont get proper power.

mboy67
01-03-2010, 06:10 PM
I own two 4870's never had any issue with them but I have seen a lot of video problems do to poor power. Now your PS should do the trick but it might be defective or your card might be. First things first is to make sure the board and CPU post with another card. if they do then try your card in another system if it posts then I would next try your power supply.

Hans
01-05-2010, 07:07 AM
Any news yet on what was wrong?

NewCasa
01-05-2010, 08:09 AM
Yes. I took it over to Fuddruckers' and he fixed it for me. He said that one of the standoffs for the motherboard was shorting things out.

Thanks again Fuddrucker :)

Scabtacular
01-05-2010, 08:50 AM
I always try to use the plastic standoffs or at the very least those little red carbon washers to help prevent this from ever happening. I keep them in a small plastic ziplock bag inside my computer toolbox. If you ever stripped computers before, besides the screws, these can be more available in older throw away systems.

NewCasa
01-05-2010, 12:19 PM
I always try to use the plastic standoffs or at the very least those little red carbon washers to help prevent this from ever happening. I keep them in a small plastic ziplock bag inside my computer toolbox. If you ever stripped computers before, besides the screws, these can be more available in older throw away systems.

That is a very good point. I have to admit with some embarassment that this is not the first time I've had the same problem. To my credit though, I only do a build about once every 3-4 years at if that, so I guess I'm entitled to be a little backward.

Do you know if those plastic standoffs are available from NCIX or Clockwork maybe?

Scabtacular
01-06-2010, 09:19 PM
http://www.ncix.com/products/?sku=9060276&vpn=PCSCREWKIT&manufacture=STARTECH.COM

http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/searchtools/item-Details.asp?EdpNo=1024615&sku=ULT31578

Call Joe, and tell em what your situation is. Odds are he might not charge you for the plastic ones.

Scabtacular
01-06-2010, 09:21 PM
Further research found out that the answer is not Yes Or No!!!

IT's BOTH!!!

I strongly disagree with the suggestion of using nylon washers between the screw impressions and the MB. The circular area around each mounting hole is ground plane and intended to be in contact with the metal of the box. Placing a non-conductor such as nylon between the MB and the metal would limit the amount of ground contact to the threaded portion of each screw where it screws into the bottom plate. That may or may not be enough ground. Poor grounding can cause all sorts of weird anomalies.

100% correct. Most people think that they are supposed to prevent contact, but this is in fact incorrect. The motherboards are designed to have metal contacts around the mounting holes which are meant to connect to the metal case, causing the entire case to be pulled to ground. If you electrically isolate the case from the motherboard, there is no guarantee it is grounded, and this can cause all sorts of problems as the person above noted, all sorts of capacitances can actually hurt the performance of the motherboard in certain circumstances, and if at anypoint the motherboard did contact the case, you could short something

case in point: don't insulate the motherboard from the standoffs

Thanks for your advice, Ram1009 and uh_no. As I started to put in the mobo last night, I had a sort of epiphany; I realized that the whole point of standoffs was to prevent the solder joints on the back of the board from making contact with the backplate *and* to ground the case. So, I actually decided not to put in the washers, and it worked fine. Nice to know you agree with that decision - thanks again everybody. :-)

NewCasa
01-06-2010, 09:28 PM
Aha! Ok - I don't think I'll call Joe. Thanks for the follow-up.

Got another question for you. I notice a guy is selling his 4850 on Soo Today. I just checked around and it seems that Crossfire will actually allow you to link a 4850 and 4870. Ever hear of that? Any thoughts?

Upper Decker
01-06-2010, 11:14 PM
yep you can crossfire a 4850+4870. Havent tried it myself yet though.But the price hes asking is too high.

NewCasa
01-06-2010, 11:28 PM
yep you can crossfire a 4850+4870. Havent tried it myself yet though.But the price hes asking is too high.

I was thinking $75. Still too high you think? How hard is it to crossfire them? That board is set up for crossfire right?

Upper Decker
01-06-2010, 11:48 PM
Yep you just have to slap both cards in and attach a crossfire bridge, both cards should have one. If your not gaming id say its a waste as that 4870 on its own is perfectly capable of handling everything out there.

NewCasa
01-07-2010, 12:17 AM
Yep you just have to slap both cards in and attach a crossfire bridge, both cards should have one. If your not gaming id say its a waste as that 4870 on its own is perfectly capable of handling everything out there.

We'll see how it goes. I used to game quite a bit - maybe I'll pick up something new ;)