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dancingqueen
03-03-2010, 09:34 AM
How do you feel about the Olympics? What good do they do?
How much money was (in my opinion) wasted on the Olympics instead of helping the needy?
AIDS in Africa
Quake in Hati
Homelessness
Drug addiction
disability services
OW
Food banks
etc...

What are your thoughts on this?

bluekrissyspikes
03-03-2010, 09:42 AM
i don't like the olympics cause they take up too much tv time. i'm not into sports and couldn't care less. why does everyone need to try to be #1?? does it make them a better person or something? i guess it's nice if you are into it but, like you, i think What a WASTE of time, money and effort. the $$ sucked up by them could have been put into paying our doctors better so they'd stop running down south or out of the country where they can make whatever they want.

Giggle Squirt
03-03-2010, 09:58 AM
the original olympic games were actually shut down because of the pagan influences that came with them. 1500 years later they started up again with the "modern olympic games" the ancient games were more combat related. I think we should bring back the original games with the combat and naked races.

Strife
03-03-2010, 10:04 AM
I think the olympics are a good thing. Yeah sure they get alot of TV time but thats the media. Some sports are not really mainstream sports like alpine skiing. What started out as a hobby to some, is a competition to others. People compete to prove that they are the best. Where there is mankind, there is always the will to compete.

Craig Huckerby
03-03-2010, 10:07 AM
I love the Olympics, it's a change of pace for 2 1/2 weeks... and they certainly united this country for sure..

verotik66
03-03-2010, 10:32 AM
agree with Craig

MaO3
03-03-2010, 10:55 AM
Me too. I'm not a sports fan but during the olympics I watched all differnent sports. I really enjoyed them and must admit I was thrilled when a canadian got gold. I cheered them on like I knew them personally.

I think it was GREAT for Canada as a country!

I did miss my TV though!

Karen-Annie
03-03-2010, 10:58 AM
I understand the objections about the cost of the Olympics with all the need in the world. Having said that, I also believe that the world needs "spectacle" and gathering together for "fun". It is entirely possible to get "tragedy overload" to the point that depression sets in and you start isolating yourself because you feel you need to in order to protect your sanity. The Olympics, even when they are controversial, boycotted,etc., brings "ordinary" people together as opposed to political summits where it seems all each leader does is a whole lot of posturing rather than actually working towards making the world a better place.

Commercialism aside, I do think that the athletes and the visitors/spectators from all over the world getting together recharges batteries, has them talking to each other about "fun" stuff( for want of a better term) and interacting on a social level. We see each other on a different level and get to know a little more about the "human" side of the world we live in.

Patriotism, while certainly on display, did not hinder people from other countries cheering on partcipants from other than their own nation. Rivalries notwithstanding, I believe the Olympics does take us out of the humdrum of everyday living and give us things to marvel at.

As for what it does to television schedules, I'd certainly rather have regular programming hijacked for the Olympics than non-stop coverage of horror stories or Tiger Woods latest update. Feb. is usually a month dedicated to reruns, Olympics or not, anyway. At least they gave us some utterly mahhhhhvellous moments-funny ones, uplifting ones, thrilling ones and proud ones. For every not-so-nice thing there were 10 good things. No Games are free of glitches, iffy decisions by judges/referees, etc. and there as those who would complain just because that is what they do. But I, for one, think these and other similar gatherings DO make the world a better place to live in.

Bill Nash
03-03-2010, 11:11 AM
How do you feel about the Olympics? What good do they do?
How much money was (in my opinion) wasted on the Olympics instead of helping the needy?
AIDS in Africa
Quake in Hati
Homelessness
Drug addiction
disability services
OW
Food banks
etc...

What are your thoughts on this?

AIDs in Africa, ... I don't want my tax dollars going to another country, that's what charities are to do.

Quake in Haiti, ... ditto, ... where does this foreign aid thing stop, .... never.

Homelessness, drug addiction, DI, OW, food banks, etc., .... provincial problems at best. There are already services in place to deal with this, and they have an annual budget. Many of these type of people don't pay taxs anyways, I do and I want my money to go to the olympics once every 20 years or so.

26 million Canadians watched at least part of the gold medal hockey game. 16 million Canadians watched it all. I think that is a good indication that Canadians want to continue with the Olympic support and want to see a repeat in 2014.

Giggle Squirt
03-03-2010, 11:17 AM
without the olympics we wouldn't have johnny weir. I love his costumes and his ability to skate.

dancingqueen
03-03-2010, 12:10 PM
AIDs in Africa, ... I don't want my tax dollars going to another country, that's what charities are to do.

Quake in Haiti, ... ditto, ... where does this foreign aid thing stop, .... never.
I can see your point here... don't agree, but I can see it.


Homelessness, drug addiction, DI, OW, food banks, etc., .... provincial problems at best. There are already services in place to deal with this, and they have an annual budget. Many of these type of people don't pay taxs anyways, I do and I want my money to go to the olympics once every 20 years or so.
our social services "funding" is in the toilet, I won't get into the details of why these services are important, that's for another thread I suppose (or a pre-existing one :smile: ) we can't take care of the important things in our country, yet we got lots of money to throw at competing with one another? Seems to me we got some messed up priorities...

official soonet pu$$ycat
03-03-2010, 12:15 PM
DQ would you be willing to quit drinking and give any money you save from that to charity?

dancingqueen
03-03-2010, 12:22 PM
DQ would you be willing to quit drinking and give any money you save from that to charity?

I suppose not...
I guess I just think it's sickening how much money gets donated to the Olympics in comparison to how much goes to needy organisations. I don't have a problem with the Olympics happening, and being donated to, it's just the amount, the ratio is way off

Giggle Squirt
03-03-2010, 12:24 PM
well the amount may seem large but considering the size of the event i would say it is reasonable. Now if they were to sepnd 30 million dollars to put on a show at the essar center then I would be a bit pissy.

official soonet pu$$ycat
03-03-2010, 12:26 PM
I suppose not...


LOL you love those drinks don't you.

dancingqueen
03-03-2010, 12:28 PM
I sure do...
hey, shouldn't you be feeding the doc by now? it's after noon!

official soonet pu$$ycat
03-03-2010, 12:35 PM
Not on wednesdays. But thanks for reminding me. Tonight he gets to start the Reba show.

dancingqueen
03-03-2010, 12:45 PM
oh no... poor Doc.... I'm sure he deserves it though....

official soonet pu$$ycat
03-03-2010, 12:48 PM
oh no... poor Doc.... I'm sure he deserves it though....

Don't feel sorry for him. When he used to be in charge and read your posts, he would yell obscenities about you.

SSMP
03-03-2010, 12:52 PM
Homelessness
Drug addiction
disability services
This money was not spent in a vacuum.
The money was spent giving jobs to people in Vancouver for more than 7 years, you don't think that that was in anyway helpful to the homeless situation. It also went to improving mass transit in Vancouver, also helpful to the poorer people and the diabled. As for disablility sevices, these venues for the Olympics also are going to be used for the paraolympics, therefore the venues all had to be handycap friendly. This has provided not only athletics facilities for the diabled but the Olympic village aslo had to be handycap friendly, these facilities will be sold after the games, providing handycap friendly places for people to live.
Lastly there is the business contacts made for the city, thousands of people flooded into Vancouver for these games, a lot were not only there for the games but also to make business contacts which will also improve the economy in Vancouver.
You have to look at the bigger picture and what having the Olympics means for a city.

Jack Butler
03-03-2010, 12:54 PM
I think the money invested comes back or will come back to us in the end
You can't spend better money than that which inspires our youth...I believe it did in a big way.
It should produce a healthier more active child or perhaps generation that should actually reflect in our health care.
If the country has to produce some incentive, so be it....I'm in 100%!

Bill Nash
03-03-2010, 01:27 PM
Speaking of the homeless, ... it is interesting to note that the city of Vancouver tried to relocate its homeless to places like Victoria during the Olympics so that they would be "out of the way" for the visitors. I don't know how successful this was, but I got my information from my daughters. One lives in Vancouver and works with homeless people, and the other lives in Victoria and heard about the program through the grapevine.

Karen-Annie
03-03-2010, 02:18 PM
Speaking of the homeless, ... it is interesting to note that the city of Vancouver tried to relocate its homeless to places like Victoria during the Olympics so that they would be "out of the way" for the visitors. I don't know how successful this was, but I got my information from my daughters. One lives in Vancouver and works with homeless people, and the other lives in Victoria and heard about the program through the grapevine.

Every nation and city that hosts something big like this does the same thing. The Chinese bulldozed whole neighbourhoods in Beijing. If they relocated these people to Victoria, maybe it was in some ways a better enviroment for them......Victoria is a pretty nice city. I don't know what arrangements were made for them but we can't automatically say it was a bad thing.

dancingqueen
03-03-2010, 02:22 PM
I think the benefits could be more... beneficial if it was spent on something other than stroking our ego for the Olympics...
And Karen-Anne, I will say it is a bad thing.

Craig Huckerby
03-03-2010, 02:23 PM
Hey maybe if one day the Sault hosts the Olympics then we can bulldoze Gore Street :)

official soonet pu$$ycat
03-03-2010, 03:29 PM
Hey maybe if one day the Sault hosts the Olympics then we can bulldoze Gore Street :)

I would so loot the cake place

opinionated
03-03-2010, 11:52 PM
This money was not spent in a vacuum.
The money was spent giving jobs to people in Vancouver for more than 7 years, you don't think that that was in anyway helpful to the homeless situation. It also went to improving mass transit in Vancouver, also helpful to the poorer people and the diabled. As for disablility sevices, these venues for the Olympics also are going to be used for the paraolympics, therefore the venues all had to be handycap friendly. This has provided not only athletics facilities for the diabled but the Olympic village aslo had to be handycap friendly, these facilities will be sold after the games, providing handycap friendly places for people to live.
Lastly there is the business contacts made for the city, thousands of people flooded into Vancouver for these games, a lot were not only there for the games but also to make business contacts which will also improve the economy in Vancouver.
You have to look at the bigger picture and what having the Olympics means for a city.




I agree with this post 100%. The Olympics, as big and expensive as they were, have lasting effects. So many things were done that wouldn't have been even thought of aside from the Olympics.

Not to mention, the BBC, which originally dissed our Olympics are now saying that perhaps they were the best ever..... I've been following foreign news sources and they're all saying good things. Makes me proud, these Olympics changed the country - I drove home from Ottawa today and never have I ever seen so many Canadian flags. Hopefully it is a lasting thing.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/jamespearce/2010/02/worst_ever_these_olympics_may.html

Bill Nash
03-04-2010, 09:02 AM
Every nation and city that hosts something big like this does the same thing. The Chinese bulldozed whole neighbourhoods in Beijing. If they relocated these people to Victoria, maybe it was in some ways a better enviroment for them......Victoria is a pretty nice city. I don't know what arrangements were made for them but we can't automatically say it was a bad thing.

They may have been homeless, but they were homeless in Vancouver. To them, the city of Vancouver is their home. To uproot them and force them to move was probably traumatic for some people who couldn't understand the need.

Also, the city of Victoria already has homeless people, ... they don't need any more. Where are they to stay while in Victoria, .... do they just dump them on a street corner and say, "OK, find yourself a park bench and we'll see you in three weeks..."? Did they even take them back to Vancouver after the Olmpics, .... and how would they find them?

Senseless act if they did do this.

Scoff
03-04-2010, 09:58 AM
i don't like the olympics cause they take up too much tv time. i'm not into sports and couldn't care less.

Yes, but most other people in the world like friendly competition and sport.


why does everyone need to try to be #1?? does it make them a better person or something?

Why yes dear ... it makes them #1. The best at what they do.

These remarks remind me of the last year in the Sault .. "oh no, don't throw a party for the 1000+ employees for Christmas! No! Hire back two people who got laid off!"

Yes, so let's punish 1000+ people to bring back two lazy SoB workers.

Same principal ... why make millions/billions all over the world suffer (taking away the heritage & prestige of the Olympic games) so that we could help a few hundred thousand.

There's a time and place ... the Olympics do a lot more than take up your precious TV time.

Oscar_Leroy
03-04-2010, 06:21 PM
I love the Olympics. I get to stop watching the Leafs lose and cheer for a winning team once every four years. Don't take that away from me..

Super Gram
03-04-2010, 07:31 PM
I love the Olympics, it's a change of pace for 2 1/2 weeks... and they certainly united this country for sure..

I agree with Craig.....and the hockey WOW!!

Jack Butler
03-04-2010, 10:58 PM
Here's the perspective of Brian Williams, NBC Olympic Anchor and Managing Editor.
It was posted in the Olympic thread that was deleted.
I thought it was worthy enough to repost it.

Leaving Behind A Thank-You Note.


After tonight's broadcast and after looting our hotel mini-bars, we're going to try to brave the blizzard and fly east to home and hearth, and to do laundry well into next week. Before we leave this thoroughly polite country, the polite thing to do is leave behind a thank-you note.

Thank you, Canada:

For being such good hosts.

For your unfailing courtesy.

For your (mostly) beautiful weather.

For scheduling no more than 60 percent of your float plane departures at the exact moment when I was trying to say something on television.

For not seeming to mind the occasional (or constant) good-natured mimicry of your accents.

For your unique TV commercials -- for companies like Tim Hortons -- which made us laugh and cry.

For securing this massive event without choking security, and without publicly displaying a single automatic weapon.

For having the best garment design and logo-wear of the games -- you've made wearing your name a cool thing to do.

For the sportsmanship we saw most of your athletes display.

For not honking your horns. I didn't hear one car horn in 15 days -- which also means none of my fellow New Yorkers rented cars while visiting.

For making us aware of how many of you have been watching NBC all these years.

For having the good taste to have an anchorman named Brian Williams on your CTV network, who turns out to be such a nice guy.

For the body scans at the airport which make pat-downs and cavity searches unnecessary.

For designing those really cool LED Olympic rings in the harbor, which turned to gold when your athletes won one.

For always saying nice things about the United States...when you know we're listening.

For sharing Joannie Rochette with us.

For reminding some of us we used to be a more civil society.

Mostly, for welcoming the world with such ease and making lasting friends with all of us.

http://simonwhitfield.blogspot.com/2010/02/i-know-im-not-supposed-to-publish.html

verotik66
03-05-2010, 09:27 AM
They may have been homeless, but they were homeless in Vancouver. To them, the city of Vancouver is their home. To uproot them and force them to move was probably traumatic for some people who couldn't understand the need.

Also, the city of Victoria already has homeless people, ... they don't need any more. Where are they to stay while in Victoria, .... do they just dump them on a street corner and say, "OK, find yourself a park bench and we'll see you in three weeks..."? Did they even take them back to Vancouver after the Olmpics, .... and how would they find them?

Senseless act if they did do this.

if they are homeless how can the city of Vancouver be their home?

verotik66
03-05-2010, 09:30 AM
In these Olympics, Canadians only paid attention to Canada
Posted Sunday, Feb. 28, 2010 Comments (447) Recommend (238) Print Share Share Buzz up! Reprints

By GIL LeBRETON

glebreton@star-telegram.com

lebreton Evan Lysacek struck a blow for U.S. men's figure skating, giving legendary coach Frank Carroll an Olympic champion for the first time.

Texas-based Olympians fared well, winning five medals, which is as many as Finland, Japan and Italy.

Speedskater Chad Hedrick of Spring earned silver and bronze medals, Denton's Jordan Malone won a relay bronze in short track, and the Dallas Stars' Brenden Morrow (gold) and Jere Lehtinen (bronze) are going home with hockey medals.

But a lot happened that didn't make the front pages of the Vancouver newspapers or find its way into the Canadian TV network's opening montage.

Norway's Marit Bjoergen won three gold medals, a silver and a bronze in cross-country skiing to become the ninth athlete to win five medals at a single Winter Olympics.

Skier Maria Riesch finished in the top 10 in all five Alpine events. Her native country, Germany, won at least one medal on every day of this Winter Olympics.

American short track speedskater Apolo Ohno won three medals, giving him eight and making him the most decorated U.S. Winter Olympian of all time. But that's nothing -- Norway's Ole Einar Bjoerndalen, at age 36, won two biathlon medals and now has 11.

Canada's rush to the victory stand over the Games' final week resulted in a Winter Olympics record for a single nation, 14 total. The U.S. hockey team can take solace that its silver-medal finish Sunday was the Americans' 37th medal, also a record for one nation.

But for the most part, the most underappreciated soul at these Olympics was an American or a European on the medals stand.

Yes, every host nation cheers lustily for its native Olympians. But never in my experience to the extent that we saw here, where the rest of the world's athletes were little more than drink coasters at the party.

South Korean Kim Yu-Na's dazzling gold-medal performance in women's figure skating, for example, was overwhelmed here by the attention given to Quebec's Joannie Rochette, whose mother tragically died.

Chief organizer of the Games, John Furlong, mentioned Kumaritashvili briefly in his Closing Ceremony remarks. But the hosts' insensitivity had long ago been duly noted.

At a news conference Saturday, for example, someone asked Ken Melamed, mayor of Whistler, where the luge run was located, if the village planned some sort of memorial to the luger from Georgia.

Why, yes, the mayor said, "We have to find a way to acknowledge Nodar... and the Canadian athletes that have done well."

See? They don't get it.

The Vancouver Games' ticketing policy didn't help the partisan scene at the venues. To order Olympic tickets through the Vancouver 2010 Web site, a buyer had to have a Canadian address.

China sold 6.8 million tickets to its 2008 Summer Olympics. Vancouver only made 1.6 million available. The Canadians wanted to "Own the Podium," but organizers made sure that they owned the grandstands at each venue as well.

I'm still mystified that Canada fans were able to grab what seemed to be 98 percent of the tickets at the hockey venue. Olympic crowds have always been more inclusive.

In his closing news conference Sunday, IOC president Jacques Rogge acknowledged that there were "teething pains" as the Vancouver Games began.

"There was an extraordinary embrace by the city of Vancouver," he said. "Something I've never seen before."

There was embracing, all right, but then Canadians have always had the reputation for drinking a lot of beer. The loose marijuana laws only added to the nightly revelry in the downtown streets -- which, frankly, seemed to have little to do with the Olympics.

Canada wanted to hold a party, and the Canadians did. The gold medals only seemed to fuel them.

Team Canada hockey jerseys became the uniform of the streets. Maple leafs were either hanging or on clothing everywhere.

One thing I never saw: a simple flag or shirt with the five Olympic rings. Not anywhere. After 15 Olympics, that was a first.

I didn't attend the '36 Olympics, but I've seen the pictures. Swastikas everywhere.

No political reference is meant, just an Olympic one. What on earth were the Canadians thinking?

An Olympic host is supposed to welcome the world. This one was too busy being (their word) "patriotic."

"Now you know us, eh?" chief organizer Furlong said.

We thought we did two weeks ago. Now, I'm wondering if Canadians can even recognize themselves.

Nice party. But so 1936.

Gil LeBreton, 817-390-7760
Topics: Winter Olympic Games, Lindsey Vonn

Tags: Own the Podium, Olympics

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By GIL LeBRETON

glebreton@star-telegram.com

lebreton Evan Lysacek struck a blow for U.S. men's figure skating, giving legendary coach Frank Carroll an Olympic champion for the first time.

Texas-based Olympians fared well, winning five medals, which is as many as Finland, Japan and Italy.

Speedskater Chad Hedrick of Spring earned silver and bronze medals, Denton's Jordan Malone won a relay bronze in short track, and the Dallas Stars' Brenden Morrow (gold) and Jere Lehtinen (bronze) are going home with hockey medals.

But a lot happened that didn't make the front pages of the Vancouver newspapers or find its way into the Canadian TV network's opening montage.

Norway's Marit Bjoergen won three gold medals, a silver and a bronze in cross-country skiing to become the ninth athlete to win five medals at a single Winter Olympics.

Skier Maria Riesch finished in the top 10 in all five Alpine events. Her native country, Germany, won at least one medal on every day of this Winter Olympics.

American short track speedskater Apolo Ohno won three medals, giving him eight and making him the most decorated U.S. Winter Olympian of all time. But that's nothing -- Norway's Ole Einar Bjoerndalen, at age 36, won two biathlon medals and now has 11.

Canada's rush to the victory stand over the Games' final week resulted in a Winter Olympics record for a single nation, 14 total. The U.S. hockey team can take solace that its silver-medal finish Sunday was the Americans' 37th medal, also a record for one nation.

But for the most part, the most underappreciated soul at these Olympics was an American or a European on the medals stand.

Yes, every host nation cheers lustily for its native Olympians. But never in my experience to the extent that we saw here, where the rest of the world's athletes were little more than drink coasters at the party.

South Korean Kim Yu-Na's dazzling gold-medal performance in women's figure skating, for example, was overwhelmed here by the attention given to Quebec's Joannie Rochette, whose mother tragically died.

Chief organizer of the Games, John Furlong, mentioned Kumaritashvili briefly in his Closing Ceremony remarks. But the hosts' insensitivity had long ago been duly noted.

At a news conference Saturday, for example, someone asked Ken Melamed, mayor of Whistler, where the luge run was located, if the village planned some sort of memorial to the luger from Georgia.

Why, yes, the mayor said, "We have to find a way to acknowledge Nodar... and the Canadian athletes that have done well."

See? They don't get it.

The Vancouver Games' ticketing policy didn't help the partisan scene at the venues. To order Olympic tickets through the Vancouver 2010 Web site, a buyer had to have a Canadian address.

China sold 6.8 million tickets to its 2008 Summer Olympics. Vancouver only made 1.6 million available. The Canadians wanted to "Own the Podium," but organizers made sure that they owned the grandstands at each venue as well.

I'm still mystified that Canada fans were able to grab what seemed to be 98 percent of the tickets at the hockey venue. Olympic crowds have always been more inclusive.

In his closing news conference Sunday, IOC president Jacques Rogge acknowledged that there were "teething pains" as the Vancouver Games began.

"There was an extraordinary embrace by the city of Vancouver," he said. "Something I've never seen before."

There was embracing, all right, but then Canadians have always had the reputation for drinking a lot of beer. The loose marijuana laws only added to the nightly revelry in the downtown streets -- which, frankly, seemed to have little to do with the Olympics.

Canada wanted to hold a party, and the Canadians did. The gold medals only seemed to fuel them.

Team Canada hockey jerseys became the uniform of the streets. Maple leafs were either hanging or on clothing everywhere.

One thing I never saw: a simple flag or shirt with the five Olympic rings. Not anywhere. After 15 Olympics, that was a first.

I didn't attend the '36 Olympics, but I've seen the pictures. Swastikas everywhere.

No political reference is meant, just an Olympic one. What on earth were the Canadians thinking?

An Olympic host is supposed to welcome the world. This one was too busy being (their word) "patriotic."

"Now you know us, eh?" chief organizer Furlong said.

We thought we did two weeks ago. Now, I'm wondering if Canadians can even recognize themselves.

Nice party. But so 1936.

Gil LeBreton, 817-390-7760

http://www.star-telegram.com/2010/02/28/2003874_p2/in-these-olympics-canadians-only.html

Huggy85
03-05-2010, 04:26 PM
Interesting article Verontik. I just can't figure out why you cut and pasted the same article twice in one post?

Jack Butler
03-05-2010, 05:37 PM
An American saying we are too patriotic....that's fresh.
It's obvious he has a distorted view of how the USA is perceived.
Gil LaBreton has no idea, as a Canadian, how brutal an American broadcast can be or have been in past Olympics.
That's gotta be one of the funniest things I've read!

verotik66
03-05-2010, 08:45 PM
lol i dunno why it is there 2 times, it wasnt that good the first time!

Mimi
03-05-2010, 09:06 PM
Right On JackButler!
My son lives in the States and unfortunately was only able to see some snippets of Olympics on the NBC online site (he has no cable tv). The CTV video feeds on the internet were blocked in the USA because NBC paid for the rights. He was totally frustrated with their coverage of only U.S. medals.

theShadow
03-05-2010, 09:32 PM
The only olympic coverage I could watch down here was NBC and yes it did suck. Vtic's article could easily describe the NBC coverage if just a few words were changed.