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View Full Version : Look Who's Coming To The Sault



Craig Huckerby
01-24-2011, 11:25 AM
http://soonews.ca/viewarticle.php?id=29489 Cool, I always liked his shows

dancingqueen
01-24-2011, 11:52 AM
That's pretty cool.
Very exciting!

Peety
01-24-2011, 11:53 AM
I like Bob Vila.

MissMuffett
01-24-2011, 01:59 PM
i think the home inspection course sounds pretty interesting!!!

ssmarie
01-24-2011, 02:45 PM
it is, but a costly profession for liability insurance

NewCasa
01-24-2011, 02:48 PM
it is, but a costly profession for liability insurance

Which is why many inspectors are 'over inspecting' now - to cover their little bums ;)

riggs
01-24-2011, 03:14 PM
http://soonews.ca/viewarticle.php?id=29489 Cool, I always liked his shows

An upgrade in an inspectors skills are long overdue. The Real Estate companies may not like a skilled inspector person puting their sale in jeopardy.

riggs
01-24-2011, 03:15 PM
it is, but a costly profession for liability insurance

Do you not sign a waiver on the inspection?..................... or has that changed?

Bill Nash
01-24-2011, 04:22 PM
My wife is a certified home inspector. The liability insurance is high, and so is the likelihood of being sued. Some people actually go through the trouble of getting an inspection done with the sole purpose of later suing the inspector for oversights in the inspection. That is one of the reasons a home inspector is so thorough in their inspection, .... aside from wanting to give the client good service. With insurance fees, and professional membership fees adding up to about $7,000.00 to $8,000.00 a year, an inspector is doing their first 20 inspections just to pay for their yearly costs. It is not as lucrative a business as you might think.

Some people value inspections and some think they are bunk. I am not going to argue the pros and cons about it, .... I've heard it all, .... everyone is entitled to their opinion. I can tell you that many realtors hate them because they slow up closings and give people second thoughts. Any realtor worth their salt respects the wishes of their clients (and many realtors do), and approve or recommend inspections. It is scary to hear people rave about people like Mike Holmes and how great he is as he runs down inspectors and contractors. If you met him away from the cameras, you would be surprised.

Don't worry Prime Time, I don't think there are too many pointers they can show me, .....

1337
01-24-2011, 11:31 PM
Hahahahah Mike would make you look like Canadas worst handyman. Just saying.

Also, a home inspector should only suggest certain things instead of making a point of. If someone looks wrong with the foundation, they could put "Suggest to refer to a structural engineer".

Bill Nash
01-24-2011, 11:50 PM
Hahahahah Mike would make you look like Canadas worst handyman. Just saying.

Also, a home inspector should only suggest certain things instead of making a point of. If someone looks wrong with the foundation, they could put "Suggest to refer to a structural engineer".

Go to the website for registered Canadian Home Inspectors and read some of the bulletin board there. Mike Holmes is far from a guru when it comes to home inspections. A friend of my son had their home renovated for one of the Holmes On Homes episodes. In talking with them, I can assure you he is nowhere a professional as he would make you believe. He has become the "Wal-Mart" of the renovation/inspection business. This is not to say that he isn't a good renovator, ... he knows his stuff well when it comes to how to apply and use the materials. The problem comes when he goes over the top to try and discredit another renovator or inspector for the work they have done. Remember, its reality T.V.

Sault College currently offers an online/correspondence home inspection course through Carson-Dunlop Engineering, which is the Cadillac of home inspection courses. This being said, a graduate still is subject to the pitfalls of a certified home inspector. I would be suspect of any new course being offered by Sault College as giving the graduate a realistic chance of success in the field after paying thousands of dollars for tuition. The current real estate market in the Soo cannot support the inspectors it has now, let alone more.

Your point of, "...Also, a home inspector should only suggest certain things instead of making a point of. If someone looks wrong with the foundation, they could put "Suggest to refer to a structural engineer..." is exactly true, .... that is what an inspector does, ... and they still get sued, ..... go figure.

This is a FYI post only, and not meant to be controversial or in need of opinion.

icecapp
01-25-2011, 05:21 AM
I wounder if he will be doing any night time shows.. of a different area of work.. A little table dancing etc, any where for the ladys... :embarassed::wink:

SIMBA
01-26-2011, 08:48 AM
My wife is a certified home inspector. The liability insurance is high, and so is the likelihood of being sued. Some people actually go through the trouble of getting an inspection done with the sole purpose of later suing the inspector for oversights in the inspection. That is one of the reasons a home inspector is so thorough in their inspection, .... aside from wanting to give the client good service. With insurance fees, and professional membership fees adding up to about $7,000.00 to $8,000.00 a year, an inspector is doing their first 20 inspections just to pay for their yearly costs. It is not as lucrative a business as you might think.

Some people value inspections and some think they are bunk. I am not going to argue the pros and cons about it, .... I've heard it all, .... everyone is entitled to their opinion. I can tell you that many realtors hate them because they slow up closings and give people second thoughts. Any realtor worth their salt respects the wishes of their clients (and many realtors do), and approve or recommend inspections. It is scary to hear people rave about people like Mike Holmes and how great he is as he runs down inspectors and contractors. If you met him away from the cameras, you would be surprised.

Don't worry Prime Time, I don't think there are too many pointers they can show me, .....


Interesting!

riggs
01-26-2011, 01:11 PM
Go to the website for registered Canadian Home Inspectors and read some of the bulletin board there. Mike Holmes is far from a guru when it comes to home inspections. A friend of my son had their home renovated for one of the Holmes On Homes episodes. In talking with them, I can assure you he is nowhere a professional as he would make you believe. He has become the "Wal-Mart" of the renovation/inspection business. This is not to say that he isn't a good renovator, ... he knows his stuff well when it comes to how to apply and use the materials. The problem comes when he goes over the top to try and discredit another renovator or inspector for the work they have done. Remember, its reality T.V.

So you're saying he's not perfect? I'm sure no contractor is without his faults and mistakes. But give him credit where it's do, which is making contractors accountable for their mistakes. This is the area where our current system needs to be fixed to protect the consumer.

Bill Nash
01-26-2011, 04:23 PM
So you're saying he's not perfect? I'm sure no contractor is without his faults and mistakes. But give him credit where it's do, which is making contractors accountable for their mistakes. This is the area where our current system needs to be fixed to protect the consumer.

It's made for TV exaggeration. He searches out bad houses, but there aren't that many out there. He will tear away perfectly good drywall to look for mold and all you see is the times when he finds mold, and not the hundreds of times when he doesn't find any mold. If you are willing to allow a contractor to rip apart walls without regard for cost, he will eventually find fault with something. His show is based on the premise that more than a few contractors do shoddy work, and only Mike Holmes can find and correct it. You live in the fantasy world which is Holmes On Homes.

Most contractors I know do excellent work, .... those that don't are soon out of business. If you don't do your research when looking for a contractor, then of course you might get stung, .... but who's fault is that? If you take shortcuts and don't do things like getting a written contract or building permit, ... you roll the dice. Mike Holmes also works out of a large urban center which has a propensity for numerous "fly by night" contractors. You won't find very many in smaller centers like the Sault.

I am not, or ever will, say I don't think Mike Holmes is a good contractor, .... from what I see his work is excellent and the customers are more than happy. What I am saying, however, is that the show "Holmes On Homes" is not representative of the workmanship of contractors other than Mike Holmes.

The industry is self policing. It starts with the homeowner not cutting corners when hiring a contractor to save a buck. There is nothing wrong with the system if it is followed correctly.

1) - Get several estimates from contractors who will supply references.

2) - Make sure to get a contract with the contractor outlining all costs for labor, materials, permits, an estimated finishing time, and a guarantee they will clean up the job site when finished.

3) - Make sure either the contractor or yourself takes out the appropriate permits to do the work. Scheduled inspections by a building inspector will ensure the contractor is following the building code to perform their work.

4) - Make sure the contractor uses appropriate trades people to do appropriate work. For example, a building inspector may not pass electrical work if not done by a licensed electrician.

5) - Do not pay a contractor "up front" for any of the work. A reputable contractor does not need any money up front to complete a job.

6) - Be aware that you can legally withhold 15% of the contract amount for 45 days to ensure the contractor pays off all outstanding accounts pertaining to the job. After 45 days, sub-contractors and building suppliers will probably not put a lien on your property to recoup money owing to them by your contractor.

7) - Make sure your contractor uses only "new materials" on your job.

8) - Make sure the contractor has appropriate coverage for his workers as pertaining to WSIB.

9) - Make sure your contractor carries liability insurance.

10) - Pay your contractor by cheque (certified if they wish), ....... but if paying cash, get a signed receipt stating what the payment was for, and how much of the payment remains unpaid.

You don't need Mike Holmes around if you follow these 10 steps to peace of mind.

ssmarie
01-28-2011, 04:15 PM
Why is Mike endorsing a home inspectors course - he is not a home inspector - shouldn't he be focusing on the trades and getting contractors do the job right in the first place and endorsing the trade & apprenticeship programs at the colleges? He always seems to degrade the home inspector in areas where a home insepctor can't go anyway or is this new college course going to change what a home inspector can and can not do?

cybolynx
01-28-2011, 06:06 PM
It's made for TV exaggeration. He searches out bad houses, but there aren't that many out there. He will tear away perfectly good drywall to look for mold and all you see is the times when he finds mold, and not the hundreds of times when he doesn't find any mold. If you are willing to allow a contractor to rip apart walls without regard for cost, he will eventually find fault with something. His show is based on the premise that more than a few contractors do shoddy work, and only Mike Holmes can find and correct it. You live in the fantasy world which is Holmes On Homes.

Most contractors I know do excellent work, .... those that don't are soon out of business. If you don't do your research when looking for a contractor, then of course you might get stung, .... but who's fault is that? If you take shortcuts and don't do things like getting a written contract or building permit, ... you roll the dice. Mike Holmes also works out of a large urban center which has a propensity for numerous "fly by night" contractors. You won't find very many in smaller centers like the Sault.

I am not, or ever will, say I don't think Mike Holmes is a good contractor, .... from what I see his work is excellent and the customers are more than happy. What I am saying, however, is that the show "Holmes On Homes" is not representative of the workmanship of contractors other than Mike Holmes.

The industry is self policing. It starts with the homeowner not cutting corners when hiring a contractor to save a buck. There is nothing wrong with the system if it is followed correctly.

1) - Get several estimates from contractors who will supply references.

2) - Make sure to get a contract with the contractor outlining all costs for labor, materials, permits, an estimated finishing time, and a guarantee they will clean up the job site when finished.

3) - Make sure either the contractor or yourself takes out the appropriate permits to do the work. Scheduled inspections by a building inspector will ensure the contractor is following the building code to perform their work.

4) - Make sure the contractor uses appropriate trades people to do appropriate work. For example, a building inspector may not pass electrical work if not done by a licensed electrician.

5) - Do not pay a contractor "up front" for any of the work. A reputable contractor does not need any money up front to complete a job.

6) - Be aware that you can legally withhold 15% of the contract amount for 45 days to ensure the contractor pays off all outstanding accounts pertaining to the job. After 45 days, sub-contractors and building suppliers will probably not put a lien on your property to recoup money owing to them by your contractor.

7) - Make sure your contractor uses only "new materials" on your job.

8) - Make sure the contractor has appropriate coverage for his workers as pertaining to WSIB.

9) - Make sure your contractor carries liability insurance.

10) - Pay your contractor by cheque (certified if they wish), ....... but if paying cash, get a signed receipt stating what the payment was for, and how much of the payment remains unpaid.

You don't need Mike Holmes around if you follow these 10 steps to peace of mind.

since there is no like button ...

LIKE ... lol :)

i really dont like mike holmes ... the way i see him is an ignorant tv host trying to make himself look good ...

Bill Nash
01-28-2011, 06:29 PM
Why is Mike endorsing a home inspectors course - he is not a home inspector - shouldn't he be focusing on the trades and getting contractors do the job right in the first place and endorsing the trade & apprenticeship programs at the colleges? He always seems to degrade the home inspector in areas where a home insepctor can't go anyway or is this new college course going to change what a home inspector can and can not do?

The home inspection business is an unregulated business. That means that anybody can do home inspections under that title without having to answer to anybody except a home owner in court during a lawsuit. This is why the Ontario Association of Home Inspectors lobbied and were successful in having the Ontario government pass an act regulating who can claim to be certified and who cannot.

I have no idea (and really don't care) if Mike Holmes is a certified home inspector or not. I would think he would have most of the knowledge to pass testing. I think (I could be wrong) that he operates a home inspection business in conjunction with Sears. He also has a version of his TV show where he does inspections. He does seem to think that home inspectors miss many items they should be finding, .... which is not the case. A certified home inspector must follow strict guidelines during an inspection as regulated by the provincial government,.... something Mr. Holmes conveniently ignores.

Regardless of his qualifications, I am sure Mike Holmes would be a good home inspector, but then he would have to give up a lot of his home renovation business. This is because the code of ethics of professional certified home inspectors does not allow for a conflict of interest that this would present. Mr. Holmes would not be able to work for the customer either before or after an inspection and remain a member in good standing with the association.

I think the endorsement at Sault College is nothing more than lip service by a paid personality to promote the course. I hope anyone thinking of taking the course plans on moving out of the city, because I know there isn't enough business here as a certified home inspector to make a good living at it, .... but this is just my humble opinion.