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jeff84
04-22-2011, 06:28 AM
Hello Sault Ste Marie,

So i just recently got a lab puppy and he is teething and he likes to chew on everything from my bed to my pant legs when im walking around. I got him soft chew toys and pigs ears to try and get him to stop but no luck so far. Is this common for puppys at this age or will he just grow out of it? Any help or suggestions would be great.


Thanks

HDV
04-22-2011, 10:16 AM
He will eventually grow out of it, hopefully.. Joys of having pups eh..lol But they are so darn cute. Puppys love to chew on things all the time, They teeth and chew for the first few months.

My dog use to chew the baseboards when he was a pup. Also when he was older he would do it every now and then. The vet said it was becuase sometimes dogs get itchy throats like us and that is their way or relieving it.

jeff84
04-22-2011, 07:43 PM
Yea my pups favourite thing is my boxspring of my bed. I have only had him for almost two weeks and hes on his third pigs ear. Anyway I thought that he may grow out of it in a few months, just thought id ask. Thanks HDV

Peety
04-22-2011, 07:46 PM
My mothers dog ate her new patio blinds, couch, lazy boy.Head rest of the car. It was 2 at the time.

gouligann
04-25-2011, 08:22 AM
We've raised two labs and they are notorious chewers until they are 1 year old up to even 3 years old. The best thing I can recommend is to kennel him when you can't watch him closely, and when he starts chewing on things while you are around, shove a toy into his mouth to distract him. Uless the object of his attention doesn't stain, paint tabasco sauce on taboo things that he favors chewing on.

As for a choice of toys, get him things that aren't similar to "good" things in your house. He can't tell the difference between a slipper and a stuffed toy. Hard rubber toys are great as long as you don't have kids who play with rubber toys also.

Joy.D
04-25-2011, 09:22 AM
When you catch him chewing something he is not supposed to correct him then give him something he is allowed to chew on( toy/ rawhide/ pigear). He is experiencing a combination of boredom and exploration. Correct it right away or you may loose your furniture , walls , door frames, table legs etc...

It is a phase and will pass if corrected before the behavior sticks.

Get him a constant supply of whatever he likes to chew Bully Sticks worked for me and they dont go through them as fast as pig ears.

jeff84
04-26-2011, 02:09 PM
Thanks for all the suggestions! im sure it will help.

A*lil*Loopy
04-26-2011, 05:35 PM
You can also spray a few things like the box spring with "Bitter Apple" spray. You have to repeat a few times but it tastes terrible and can help deter the little chewer.
I have a lab mix and he's over 2 and I can't leave him alone in a vehicle (chewed a seatbelt off), alone in the house (drags the garbage pail around and removes things from counters). He's a smart and fun guy but loves to destroy things when he's left alone (although he's got 4 pug buddies).

We've kennel trained him and he even knows that when I say I've got to go to work, he goes to his kennel. I never was a fan of kennels but now that we use one, I don't worry about him while I'm gone.

gouligann
04-27-2011, 08:00 AM
I also used to refer to a kennel as a "cage" and thought it was kind of cruel to put a dog into a cage. When we got our first lab, we didn't have a kennel and she was the hardest dog to toilet train and she chewed everything in sight (and out of sight lol). I was home all the time and took her out very often, but still she found hiding spots and went to the bathroom inside. She was 6 months when she finally "got" it that outside was the proper place to go lol.

We were given a kennel to use for our second lab and I couldn't believe the difference. No chewing and toilet training was a breeze. Now I feel that kennels are a wonderful training tool and only cruel if people leave their dogs in that "cage" for hours on end and they end up having to soil in there instead of being taken out.

GreyWolf
04-30-2011, 10:29 PM
My dog has passed away now, after a tumor/old age. When she was a puppy she loved to teethe on things, but we discouraged her biting anyone, so we did not let her (we did not play with her by letting her mouth our hands). She was given cold items, like a frozen dish cloth- This helps sooth the pain just as it would or a human baby. My dog grew into a very gentle therapy dog for the elderly.

Disourage any tug o war games and don't give them toys that feel or look the same as something you don't want them to chew. For example, if you would like your socks not to be chewed, don't give the dog old socks to play with.
You may want to stay away from soft toys for now, while they chew- it may end up swallowed or associated with soft furniture. I gave my dog stuffed toys but only bc her personality , she never chewed them but slept on them. Give them Kongs or hard toys to chew- nothing breakable.
Goodluck!

PS- Pig Ears are very dangerous for their digestion. Dogs should never eat something which can splinter. Wild dogs are able to do this because they eat the animals fur and all bone or splinters get caught in the fur and come out the other end. Domesticated dogs eat these products a great risk. Pig ears also contain a lot of grease.

Soup bones , beacuse they are big and won't break apart- boiled and cooled will be okay-some do raw for the dogs to chew on. Has to be the big bones. No chicken bones or bones that splinter or break or are small to swallow.

tizzma
04-30-2011, 11:45 PM
I agree-good advice

gouligann
05-01-2011, 08:20 AM
My dog has passed away now, after a tumor/old age. When she was a puppy she loved to teethe on things, but we discouraged her biting anyone, so we did not let her (we did not play with her by letting her mouth our hands). She was given cold items, like a frozen dish cloth- This helps sooth the pain just as it would or a human baby. My dog grew into a very gentle therapy dog for the elderly.

Disourage any tug o war games and don't give them toys that feel or look the same as something you don't want them to chew. For example, if you would like your socks not to be chewed, don't give the dog old socks to play with.
You may want to stay away from soft toys for now, while they chew- it may end up swallowed or associated with soft furniture. I gave my dog stuffed toys but only bc her personality , she never chewed them but slept on them. Give them Kongs or hard toys to chew- nothing breakable.
Goodluck!

PS- Pig Ears are very dangerous for their digestion. Dogs should never eat something which can splinter. Wild dogs are able to do this because they eat the animals fur and all bone or splinters get caught in the fur and come out the other end. Domesticated dogs eat these products a great risk. Pig ears also contain a lot of grease.

Soup bones , beacuse they are big and won't break apart- boiled and cooled will be okay-some do raw for the dogs to chew on. Has to be the big bones. No chicken bones or bones that splinter or break or are small to swallow.


I agree with everything except for soup bones being safe. YES, they DO break apart: 2 stories with happy endings...

1) I never did give our dogs soup bones, but my in-laws did and they lived next door to us. (I asked them not to, but they wouldn't listen. Of course dogs naturally eat bones, right?... Wrong!) Our first lab was given a big knuckle joint, chewed the round cap off in one piece and tried to swallow it. It lodged down her throat sideways. Fortunately I came home and when I found her in our garage, I knew something was wrong by the way she was sounding ( labored breathing). I had to reach my fingers way down her throat and pulled it up out of her. It came up bloody and I truly think she would have died if I hadn't arrived when I did.

f2) A friend used to occasionally give her Newfie large soup bones. The dog ended up at the vet with an impaction of chewed up bone pieces in the bowels and it was a very painful (and expensive) proceedure to have them removed.

GreyWolf
05-01-2011, 10:49 AM
It's important to know your dog and always supervise the dog if you decide to give them a soup bone.
My own dog as a puppy didn't have the strength to tear down a soup bone that was bigger than her, and she was not left alone to chew for more then 15-20 minutes before it's taken away.
Most times when these factors are looked at (size of dog, strength, size and durability of bone, type of soup bone, time limits,) the dog will be safer. But there are risks to everything and it's not for all dogs nor are all soup bones safe without splintering. (some types of soup bones splinter I've been told).

It's important to know the risks of everything and make a decision based on your dog. For example, commercialized foods are not without risks as well, my own dog lost her fur because of it and we couldn't give her it. It's alright for some dogs while not others. As a puppy a soup bone was too big and too tough for her, and 15 minutes supervised was no risk. Continuous chewing by a large dog or even a small dog if given the bone for days can lead to the bone breaking- so time limits are important.

So I do agree- there's risks and there's factors to consider. Same with many other things as well. My dog once chocked on a treat/dog cookie-got lodged in her throat, so it is important to supervise feedings. If a person sees a bone being broken, they should not continue feeding this to their dog.