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Saultgirl
06-04-2011, 12:46 PM
What types of goats do well in this area? Can they live outside all winter with a shelter, or do they need a warm barn to come in to?

A*lil*Loopy
06-09-2011, 06:43 PM
Most goats do well here. Are you thinking of getting into goats for the meat production/milk/pets? Your breed may depend on what you are wanting them for.
They do need a barn, preferably warm during the winter with bedding, lots of water and minerals. During the summer months they need shelter from rain and shade from the sun as well as plenty of fresh water and a mineral block. Goats tend to overheat and are prone to upset tummies because of their nerves..........yes, they are sensitive animals.
Warning! Research health problems that can occur with goats and learn what questions to ask as all goats aren't the same and sometimes sellers are less than honest.

Also........fencing needs to be goatproof. Goats can squeeze through the tiniest spots (one of ours got through a chicken door) so you need to have good quality fencing because they are great escape artists.

kitca
06-09-2011, 10:00 PM
my friends who have had goats as pets and or to milk just loved them! they said they were very friendly and affectionate and easy.

HDV
06-10-2011, 11:04 AM
Years ago my aunt had a goat. She raised him for meat. Well when they day came to butcher the poor goat, they cooked him and when my aunt placed the cooked meat on the table they all burst into tears and no one could eat him :(

Saultgirl
06-11-2011, 09:00 AM
Most goats do well here. Are you thinking of getting into goats for the meat production/milk/pets? Your breed may depend on what you are wanting them for.
They do need a barn, preferably warm during the winter with bedding, lots of water and minerals. During the summer months they need shelter from rain and shade from the sun as well as plenty of fresh water and a mineral block. Goats tend to overheat and are prone to upset tummies because of their nerves..........yes, they are sensitive animals.
Warning! Research health problems that can occur with goats and learn what questions to ask as all goats aren't the same and sometimes sellers are less than honest.

Also........fencing needs to be goatproof. Goats can squeeze through the tiniest spots (one of ours got through a chicken door) so you need to have good quality fencing because they are great escape artists.

Hi, thanks for getting back to me. I was thinking about getting a goat or two as a pet and additional companion to my horses; with the two horses I was hoping I could take one horse out and leave the other with the goat and everyone would be happy.

When you say they need a barn iin the winter, does that mean they need to stay in most of the time? Or could they go out all day and come in for the night?

Existing fencing is page wire which we will be adding a strand of electric to.

A*lil*Loopy
06-11-2011, 05:51 PM
You may want to add that electric on the inside about 18" from the ground. Some of them can squeeze through, especially when they are small. We ended up using 2x4 Redbrand horse fence but there are more affordable options I wasn't aware of at the time. Two goats are best as they can be a bit insecure and horses just don't play the same as goats do. Males stink! as they are designed to but a wether (fixed male) does not, but a dehorned goat is best. Our Special Eddy(wether) can't be with our others as he likes to bash the girls with his horns which has turned into a pain in the arse.

If your "leave behind" horse is herdbound, a goat may not necessarily help. Another horse might. I currently have 3 horses and we are in the same predicament as we can't take the two riding because the third is extremely herdbound.
As long as the weather isn't too bad and they have a good winter coat, goats can go outside during the winter days. So, yes, I guess staying in most of the time is a good possibility depending on the winter.

On the upside, they make great pets, are great for brush/lawn trimming, can be extremely affectionate and you can always keep them for fresh milk, butter, yogurt, and cheese.