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Huggy85
02-18-2012, 12:48 PM
Exposed: Michigan Teachers’ Union’s Troubling Playbook

The teachers’ unions have once again been caught red-handed. A manual distributed by the Michigan Education Association has come to light, and its contents are troubling.

The manual revels in the illegality of striking, comparing the unions’ efforts to drain more taxpayer dollars to the work of Gandhi. Strikes hurt children, of course, by depriving them of a stable school environment (it’s why they’re illegal, after all), but that argument would probably be unpersuasive to the teachers’ unions — they are unashamed about using children as political props:

“In terms of a bargaining message, the public responds most positively when we talk about children, quality in the classroom and the future,” the MEA manual states. “There may come a time when it’s appropriate to talk about money and benefits, but lay the groundwork first.”

The manual even suggests one slogan that it claims has worked for other locals: “It’s not about dollars and cents; it’s about our children.”

In other words: use the kids for political cover, and don’t let the public latch onto what we’re really after: “money and benefits.” Anyone who opposes using more taxpayer dollars to fund unions is “against children.”

Albert Shanker, former head of the American Federation of Teachers, is reported to have remarked that “when school children start paying union dues, then I’ll start representing the interests of school children

How our children benefit from teachers demanding a raise while everyone else has to tighten their belts — actually, at the expense of everyone else already tightening their belts — remains unexplained; it is simply taken for granted. Contrary to the unions’ suggested propaganda slogans, it is actually completely about dollars and cents; the handbook itself makes it quite clear that children are mere tools to aid in procuring more money and benefits to pad teachers’ pockets.

http://theunionlabelblog.com/2012/01...ling-playbook/

Yup. A most noble profession.

Barry Morris
02-18-2012, 03:26 PM
I do hope some qualified Michigan teacher might respond.

Huggy85
02-18-2012, 03:32 PM
I do hope some qualified Michigan teacher might respond.

I'm not sure there are any "qualified" teachers that frequent Soonet

Barry Morris
02-18-2012, 03:34 PM
Now be nice Huggy. I believe SOMEONE is qualified, and probably pretty good at it.

Considering the curiculum!!! :) :) :)

riggs
02-18-2012, 05:55 PM
Considering the curiculum!!! :) :) :)

Obsession 101??

Roll The Bones
02-18-2012, 07:24 PM
that clown is a teacher???? now it makes perfect sense... american society into the toilet that is...

those poor students...

RWGR
02-19-2012, 12:02 PM
Translation: "Man, I wish I had summers off"

I win :) :) :)

RWGR
02-19-2012, 12:03 PM
Now be nice Huggy. I believe SOMEONE is qualified, and probably pretty good at it.

Considering the curiculum!!! :) :) :)


curiculum

LOL!!!

Barry Morris
02-19-2012, 01:30 PM
curiculum

LOL!!!

Sorry, I guess I was mistaken.

Roll The Bones
02-19-2012, 05:26 PM
[B]I win :) :) :)

boooooooooooorrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrringgggg gggggggggggggggggg

when does the entertainment start clown??!!

official soonet pu$$ycat
02-19-2012, 05:36 PM
I'd use children as leverage if I was negotiating a new contract. Children are not as precious as people pretend especially when their adult teeth are growing in. They look so awkward.

KDawg
02-19-2012, 05:44 PM
I'd use children as leverage if I was negotiating a new contract. Children are not as precious as people pretend especially when their adult teeth are growing in. They look so awkward.
Very astute, Cat. All you need to do is invoke, "We're doing it for the children," and you're golden.

official soonet pu$$ycat
02-19-2012, 07:13 PM
Very astute, Cat. All you need to do is invoke, "We're doing it for the children," and you're golden.

I wish. That line has been trademarked by Kate Gosselin.

RWGR
02-20-2012, 08:30 AM
Everyone invokes the children during negations.

RWGR
02-20-2012, 08:30 AM
when does the entertainment start clown??!!

When Canada tries to defend a lead in the third period. :)

Barry Morris
02-20-2012, 09:57 AM
Everyone invokes the children during negations.

Negations??? Interesting typo. Or was it?? :) :) :)

Barry Morris
02-20-2012, 09:58 AM
When Canada tries to defend a lead in the third period. :)

Off topic, as usual, irrelevant to the topic.

Really too bad you have no responses of content. Oh well, no cut and paste available, I guess.

Huggy85
02-20-2012, 12:19 PM
Everyone invokes the children during negations.

The American educational system; and this from the teachers! So sad. No wonder an intelligent Republican cannot be found anywhere!

RWGR
02-20-2012, 03:36 PM
Ooops, someone doesn't know "negations" is a slang word to describe the under-handed goings-on of contract negotiations! :)

RWGR
02-20-2012, 03:37 PM
Off topic, as usual, irrelevant to the topic.

Really too bad you have no responses of content. Oh well, no cut and paste available, I guess.

Translation :"Hey, guys, Blue doesn't correspond with me anymore. Will you??"

Barry Morris
02-20-2012, 06:25 PM
Ooops, someone doesn't know "negations" is a slang word to describe the under-handed goings-on of contract negotiations! :)

A SLANG word, RW?? How could you??

As Rex Harrison said about the English language, "...why, In America, they haven't spoken it for years!!!"

Barry Morris
02-20-2012, 06:27 PM
Ooops, someone doesn't know "negations" is a slang word to describe the under-handed goings-on of contract negotiations! :)

Really??

ne·ga·tion (n-gshn)
n.
1. The act or process of negating.
2. A denial, contradiction, or negative statement.
3. The opposite or absence of something regarded as actual, positive, or affirmative

Yes, indeed!!!

Huggy85
02-20-2012, 06:29 PM
Really??

ne·ga·tion (n-gshn)
n.
1. The act or process of negating.
2. A denial, contradiction, or negative statement.
3. The opposite or absence of something regarded as actual, positive, or affirmative

Yes, indeed!!!

American education. When you make a spelling mistake, just call it slang

Roll The Bones
02-20-2012, 06:30 PM
Really??

narcissists never ever apologize when they're wrong... is far better to make up a cover story, even a bad one...

RWGR
02-20-2012, 06:34 PM
A SLANG word, RW?? How could you??

As Rex Harrison said about the English language, "...why, In America, they haven't spoken it for years!!!"

Yes, and hearing Canadian slaughter the Queen's English with "abooot" and "EH" all the time is like music to the ears.

Huggy85
02-20-2012, 06:34 PM
narcissists never ever apologize

They can't recognize when they are wrong; or even accept that, God forbid, they ever could be wrong!

RWGR
02-20-2012, 06:35 PM
narcissists never ever apologize when they're wrong... is far better to make up a cover story, even a bad one...

You have admitted your problem. A big step in the right direction.

RWGR
02-20-2012, 06:35 PM
They can't recognize when they are wrong; or even accept that, God forbid, they ever could be wrong!

You, too, are making headway!!

Barry Morris
02-20-2012, 06:36 PM
Yes, and hearing Canadian slaughter the Queen's English with "abooot" and "EH" all the time is like music to the ears.

Never been to Tennessee, I suppose??

The language is english, and I was born there. Eat your heart out, poor devil.

RWGR
02-20-2012, 06:36 PM
Never been to Tennessee, I suppose??

The language is english, and I was born there. Eat your heart out, poor devil.

Can't defend the Canadian slaughtering of the language! Priceless!!!!!!

Barry Morris
02-20-2012, 06:36 PM
They can't recognize when they are wrong; or even accept that, God forbid, they ever could be wrong!

It's where the term "Ugly American" started.

RWGR
02-20-2012, 06:37 PM
It's where the term "Ugly American" started.

Where did this start?

http://reviewcanada.ca/essays/2009/06/01/the-ugly-canadian/

Barry Morris
02-20-2012, 06:38 PM
Can't defend the Canadian slaughtering of the language! Priceless!!!!!!

Don't have to, never will. Ya'all have a nice day, ya hear?? :) :) :)

RWGR
02-20-2012, 06:38 PM
Don't have to, never will. Ya'all have a nice day, ya hear?? :) :) :)

It's abooot time you tell me that, EH!!

Barry Morris
02-20-2012, 06:39 PM
Where did this start?


In your case, here, 23, 021 posts ago!!

RWGR
02-20-2012, 06:40 PM
In your case, here, 23, 021 posts ago!!

23,000 posts...or half the Protestant denominations out there!!







You lose :)

SSMP
02-22-2012, 10:27 AM
Yes, and hearing Canadian slaughter the Queen's English with "abooot" and "EH" all the time is like music to the ears.
I see it is time for another English lesson, i really hope this is not one of the subjects you teach.

While the scholarly debate centers on whether eh is a Canadian expression, critics often gloss over the history of the interjection. The Modern English eh derives from Middle English interjections such as “ey,” “ei,” and “a” (“Eh,” OED). The modern spelling “eh,” could have developed independently from the Middle English variants, however, it was most likely adopted from the French “eh” (“Eh,” OED). The use of eh as a demand for repetition compares with Chaucer’s use of “I” in Troilus and Criseyde (1385): “For love of God, make of this thing an ende, / Or slee us both at ones er that ye wende . . . ‘I, what?’ quod she. ‘By God and by my trouthe, / I noot not what ye wilne that I saye” (III). By the 18th Century eh was in use as an interjectional interrogative particle and in 1771 Goldsmith writes, “Wasn’t it lucky, eh?” (“Eh,” OED 2). Eh as a request for repetition such as “Eh? What’s that, Sackville?” appears by the 19th Century (“Eh,” OED 3). This history reveals that eh has its roots in Middle English and did not originate in Canada.

Let's check out the usage in some Canadian literature:



“And who is to look after the horses, eh?”

(Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights, 1847)



“So you think he might be hard on me, eh?”

(Charles ****ens, Bleak House, 1852)



“I suppose you’re a smart fellow, eh?”

(Henry James, The American, 1867)



“Breakfast out here, eh?”

(George Bernard Shaw, Arms and the Man, 1894)



“Breathe—fresh air. Good, eh?”

(Joseph Conrad, Typhoon, 1903)



“Didn’t come, eh?” “No.”

(Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises, 1926)



“So this is Brooklyn, eh?”

(Arthur Miller, Death of a Salesman, 1949)



“Oh, she’s coming, eh, Ma?”

(Paddy Chayefsky, Marty, TV script, 1954)



“Not like some people we know, eh?”

(J. D. Salinger, Zooey, 1957)



“Let this cup pass from you, eh?” “Right.”

(Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird, 1960)



“Eh, Nat, ain’t that so?”

(John Fowler, The French Lieutenant’s Woman, 1969)

Oh wait those are not Canadians, in fact some of them appear to be Americans and heaven forbid some of them are people who use the Queen's English.
Shall we go into the word toque again too?
As I said when explaining toque to you, please let your students know what you have been taught, I would hate to have them look foolish on the internet as well.