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View Full Version : Flags from Apollo moon landing still standing, photos reveal



Hans
07-30-2012, 06:17 PM
"Intuitively, experts mostly think it highly unlikely the Apollo flags could have endured the 42 years of exposure to vacuum, about 500 temperature swings from 242 F during the day to -280 F during the night, micrometeorites, radiation and ultraviolet light, some thinking the flags have all but disintegrated under such an assault of the environment," scientist James Fincannon, of the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, wrote in the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/07/30/apollo-moon-landing-flags-still-standing/?intcmp=features#ixzz228vOhAjC


Now that's what I call good flag material.

RWGR
07-30-2012, 06:18 PM
"Intuitively, experts mostly think it highly unlikely the Apollo flags could have endured the 42 years of exposure to vacuum, about 500 temperature swings from 242 F during the day to -280 F during the night, micrometeorites, radiation and ultraviolet light, some thinking the flags have all but disintegrated under such an assault of the environment," scientist James Fincannon, of the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, wrote in the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/07/30/apollo-moon-landing-flags-still-standing/?intcmp=features#ixzz228vOhAjC


Now that's what I call good flag material.

I wonder if the Canadain fla ...


...oh, wait, you guys have never been there. The best you could do was build an arm for our space shuttle. :)

The Left Sock
07-31-2012, 10:17 PM
That's just too funny. Hans pays the Americans a compliment, only to get slagged by an anti-Canadian for his troubles.

Well, if that flag ever falls down, the Americans will have to buy tickets on a Russian rocket to get back up there and fix it. Unless, of course, they start genetically engineering teeny-tiny astronauts, to fit into those remote-controlled toys they are using, to replace the shuttle program!

Teeny-tiny astronauts! I love it!

RWGR
08-01-2012, 08:57 AM
That's just too funny. Hans pays the Americans a compliment, only to get slagged by an anti-Canadian for his troubles.

Well, if that flag ever falls down, the Americans will have to buy tickets on a Russian rocket to get back up there and fix it. Unless, of course, they start genetically engineering teeny-tiny astronauts, to fit into those remote-controlled toys they are using, to replace the shuttle program!

Teeny-tiny astronauts! I love it!

LOL..are you new here??? Hans wasn't paying any compliments to the USA. He is one of those that doubts the moon landing ever happened. This is Hans in sarcastic mode.

Still, thanks for the shuttle arm. :)

The Left Sock
08-01-2012, 09:19 AM
"Now that's what I call good flag material."

You may have forgotten how to recognize these, but these little fellers are called 'compliments'.

RWGR
08-01-2012, 09:21 AM
"Now that's what I call good flag material."

You may have forgotten how to recognize these, but these little fellers are called 'compliments'.

.awwww, how cute, he can't recognize sarcasm!! :)

RWGR
08-01-2012, 09:24 AM
The part he quotes is from a scientist claiming the flags could not withstand the environment on the moon all these years, then he says, "wow, good material"

LOL...did I really just have to explain that to you???

The Left Sock
08-01-2012, 09:27 AM
Er, no. Hans created the thread, providing compelling evidence that the flags do indeed exist, along with other substantiating evidence of multiple moon landings, and then commented on the longevity of the flag material, in a positive manner.

Has your paranoia overtaken you?

RWGR
08-01-2012, 09:28 AM
Er, no. Hans created the thread, providing compelling evidence that the flags do indeed exist, along with other substantiating evidence of multiple moon landings, and then commented on the longevity of the flag material, in a positive manner.

Has your paranoia overtaken you?

Hans is siding with the scientists that claim the flags could not still be standing.

Still, thanks for the shuttle arm :)

The Left Sock
08-01-2012, 09:32 AM
No. The scientists said "Intuitively, experts mostly think it highly unlikely the Apollo flags could have endured.." That means they were guessing, and guessed wrong.

How did you read 'could not still be standing', from that?

RWGR
08-03-2012, 03:21 PM
No. The scientists said "Intuitively, experts mostly think it highly unlikely the Apollo flags could have endured.." That means they were guessing, and guessed wrong.

How did you read 'could not still be standing', from that?

You need to slow down, and relax.

The Berean
08-04-2012, 08:44 AM
Joy

Saturday morning and no Canada bashing threads

How cool is that?

Hans
08-05-2012, 12:01 PM
Yes, I wonder why?

The Voice
08-05-2012, 01:01 PM
LOL..are you new here??? Hans wasn't paying any compliments to the USA. He is one of those that doubts the moon landing ever happened. This is Hans in sarcastic mode.

Still, thanks for the shuttle arm.(Your Welcome) :)

I wonder why the conspiracy theorists don't question the Mars Rover?

You know, isn't it just generated on a computer?

My other question is don't they realize the Russians were watching the whole time?

The Americans wanted them to see it.

RWGR
08-05-2012, 06:22 PM
I wonder why the conspiracy theorists don't question the Mars Rover?

You know, isn't it just generated on a computer?

My other question is don't they realize the Russians were watching the whole time?

The Americans wanted them to see it.

Of course we wanted them to see it. The Russians had the upper hand with Sputnik, but landing men on the moon was taking it to a whole other level. It was a huge moral victory in the Cold war.

The Berean
08-06-2012, 10:58 AM
Was for sure

40 years later it falls sorta flat

too bad

RWGR
08-06-2012, 11:00 AM
Was for sure

40 years later it falls sorta flat

too bad

Yes, because with the Soviet Union still together, and a str ...

...errr, wait ...






Anyways, the USA knocks it out of the park again: In a show of technological wizardry, the robotic explorer Curiosity blazed through the pink skies of Mars, steering itself to a gentle landing inside a giant crater for the most ambitious dig yet into the red planet's past.

A chorus of cheers and applause echoed through the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Sunday night after the most high-tech interplanetary rover ever built signaled it had survived a harrowing plunge through the thin Mars atmosphere.

"Touchdown confirmed," said engineer Allen Chen. "We're safe on Mars."

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5iN2PrwEe5n3I7vPT5NAeSRf1wQlA?docId=47754e033 cdf44c5be9700b8dffed313

The Berean
08-06-2012, 11:07 AM
good thing Columbus didnt have that technology

we d still be in Europe looking at pictures of the rockies

RWGR
08-06-2012, 11:08 AM
good thing Columbus didnt have that technology

we d still be in Europe looking at pictures of the rockies

Ummm...okay!

KARM
08-06-2012, 04:28 PM
It must be so embarrassing after beating Russia in the space race that Americans now have to hitch rides on the Russian Soyuz because they have no other way to get astronauts into space. Was beating them to the moon worth it if a country like the USA runs out of money for their manned space program before a country like Russia does?

RWGR
08-06-2012, 04:32 PM
It must be so embarrassing after beating Russia in the space race that Americans now have to hitch rides on the Russian Soyuz because they have no other way to get astronauts into space. Was beating them to the moon worth it if a country like the USA runs out of money for their manned space program before a country like Russia does?

We haven't run out of money for the space program. We just landed a rover on Mars today. What did Canada do today? Draw up designs for a new shuttle arm??? :)

We won the space race, and we won the Cold War. You watched, in envy.

We rock!!!!!

hobo
08-06-2012, 04:39 PM
Canada footed $17.8 billion of the venture

KARM
08-06-2012, 04:40 PM
Are you unwilling or unable to read the word "manned?"

It must have made Putin so proud when the Americans had to come and beg for the Russians to allow them to use their spacecraft to bring Americans into space. "Please, comrade Putin... can we hitch a ride in your Soyuz?." He must have been beaming.

RWGR
08-06-2012, 04:41 PM
footed $17.8 billion of the venture

Well kudos on money well spent. Might as well invest that money where the space technology leaders are!!! :)

RWGR
08-06-2012, 04:42 PM
Are you unwilling or unable to read the word "manned?"

It must have made Putin so proud when the Americans had to come and beg for the Russians to allow them to use their spacecraft to bring Americans into space. "Please, comrade Putin... can we hitch a ride in your Soyuz?." He must have been beaming.

So they could dock at the space station we engineered.

We build the shuttle, You build that arm that attaches to the shuttle.

we win.

RWGR
08-06-2012, 04:44 PM
Canada footed $17.8 billion of the venture

Ooops, caught you in just a small lie! :)

The University of Guelphs Ralf Gellert is the lead scientist on the Canadian contribution, which cost $17.8 million to develop.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/technology/Rover+lands+Mars+Canadians+party/7044022/story.html#ixzz22oCrCJNF

KARM
08-06-2012, 04:52 PM
Won what? All your manned spacecraft are collecting dust in museums. Obviously Russia watched NASA very closely to see what NOT to do. 20 years ago Russia was broke with their citizens in bread lines while America was "winning" in space. Now the US astronauts have to stand at the side of the road with a thumb in the air begging Russia for a ride to space while Americans are lined up for unemployment cheques and food stamps.

Enjoy your win!

RWGR
08-06-2012, 05:38 PM
Won what? All your manned spacecraft are collecting dust in museums. Obviously Russia watched NASA very closely to see what NOT to do. 20 years ago Russia was broke with their citizens in bread lines while America was "winning" in space. Now the US astronauts have to stand at the side of the road with a thumb in the air begging Russia for a ride to space while Americans are lined up for unemployment cheques and food stamps.

Enjoy your win!

Our manned program has accomplished all it needed to accomplish. Now our focus is on unmanned missions.

So, while Russia endlessly sends man after man up to orbit the earth for no good reason, and while Canada begs us to be a part of our next mission, we indeed will enjoy our WIN!!

By the way, why hasn't CASA (Canadian Aeronautics and Space Administration) sent any crafts to the moon or mars yet??? I mean, other than the fact it doesn't exist???

:)

Hans
08-06-2012, 05:46 PM
Has anybody ever wondered why all of a sudden the USSR dropped out of the space race?

KARM
08-06-2012, 05:58 PM
I wouldn't expect Canada to have our own space program, we are not a global superpower.

The US, being a superpower in decline, has to bow down to Russia in order to put a man in orbit. That's just sad. Borrowing money from China to ask Russia for permission to to go into space.

Canada may have made the robotic arm but it's Russia that is giving the US the finger.

The US accomplished all they needed to in orbit? Yeah, that's why Neil Armstrong calls NASA an embarrassment.

RWGR
08-06-2012, 06:21 PM
Has anybody ever wondered why all of a sudden the USSR dropped out of the space race?

We forced them to drop out, they couldn't keep up.

We win (just like in soccer) :)

RWGR
08-06-2012, 06:23 PM
I wouldn't expect Canada to have our own space program, we are not a global superpower.

The US, being a superpower in decline, has to bow down to Russia in order to put a man in orbit. That's just sad. Borrowing money from China to ask Russia for permission to to go into space.

Canada may have made the robotic arm but it's Russia that is giving the US the finger.

The US accomplished all they needed to in orbit? Yeah, that's why Neil Armstrong calls NASA an embarrassment.

The USA is the only superpower left. Russia cannot engineer a craft to Mars, so they send men into orbit...just like we did fifty years ago.

Neil Armstrong is mad because he is old school, and wants more money for manned flight. NASA is going in another direction.

Sorry, we win, all around (just like in soccer)!!!! :)

Barry Morris
08-06-2012, 07:01 PM
Yeah, Neil is old school.

He thinks that men should GO, they don't play video games.

Sending robots to Mars is a show, nothing more.

RWGR
08-06-2012, 07:05 PM
Yeah, Neil is old school.

He thinks that men should GO, they don't play video games.

Sending robots to Mars is a show, nothing more.

The technology does not exist to send men much further than the moon at this point. Neil thinks we should just keep sending men to the moon. NASA says we are moving above and beyond.

Yup, he is old school. Just because you are too doesn't mean he's right.

Barry Morris
08-06-2012, 07:08 PM
The problem is that you have little idea of what is possible in earth orbit.

That's because you're "too smart" to read speculative literature, i.e. well written and researched science fiction.

Too bad.

However, I'd be glad to send you some.

RWGR
08-06-2012, 07:10 PM
Meanwhile, here is how Russia's last attempt to send a craft to Mars worked out ...

The Russian space agency is battling to save a faulty Mars probe that became stuck in Earth's orbit after booster rockets failed to fire shortly after launch.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/nov/09/russian-space-agency-mars-probe

RWGR
08-06-2012, 07:11 PM
The problem is that you have little idea of what is possible in earth orbit.

That's because you're "too smart" to read speculative literature, i.e. well written and researched science fiction.

Too bad.

However, I'd be glad to send you some.

And you are too smart to believe that much of the science fiction you read is just that...FICTION.

We've been orbiting earth for almost fifty years. Yippee.

Time to move on. Move over, we'll lead the way.

As usual. :)

Hans
08-06-2012, 07:28 PM
We forced them to drop out, they couldn't keep up.

We win (just like in soccer) :)

Incorrect. The reason why they could not keep up was the dead of Sergei Pavlovich Korolev. Without him the USSR space program was effectively dead in the water.

RWGR
08-06-2012, 07:34 PM
Incorrect. The reason why they could not keep up was the dead of Sergei Pavlovich Korolev. Without him the USSR space program was effectively dead in the water.

Well then it wasn't much of an agency at all if the death of one man could doom it.

Much like the Russian economy and supposed superiority with weapons, it was all done with smoke and mirrors.

Barry Morris
08-06-2012, 07:56 PM
And you are too smart to believe that much of the science fiction you read is just that...FICTION.

We've been orbiting earth for almost fifty years. Yippee.

Time to move on. Move over, we'll lead the way.

As usual. :)

"We" lead the way?? Close. I wouldn't call a robot part of "we".

As to the fifty years, well, sci-fi speculated about a lot of interesting things that could be done in orbit with existing technology. Power satellites, medical science breakthroughs, manufacturing processes impossible in earth gravity, food production, life extension technologies, on and on.

Sending a robot all the way to Mars is useless at this point in time.

Barry Morris
08-06-2012, 07:58 PM
Meanwhile, here is how Russia's last attempt to send a craft to Mars worked out ...

The Russian space agency is battling to save a faulty Mars probe that became stuck in Earth's orbit after booster rockets failed to fire shortly after launch.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/nov/09/russian-space-agency-mars-probe

The USA's failures, due to corporate greed and incompetance, were a lot more spectacular.

Bye bye Christa.

The Left Sock
08-06-2012, 08:32 PM
I think it is obvious that the International Space Station is crucial to human development in space. The idea of an international effort, a human effort, to advance understanding and technology is vital to our future as a planet. Having said that, it becomes critical for key countries to maintain the ability to gain access to that Space Station, so this is where my disconnect with American space policy begins. Right now, Russia is the only country with 'keys to the palace', and this doesn't bode well with me. China is developing an entirely separate space program, with plans for their own space station, and quite frankly, that scares the hell out of me.

So, the Americans should have kept going with a new generation of manned vehicles, rather than the smaller, remote-controlled program they are running now. Just my opinion.

RWGR
08-06-2012, 09:01 PM
"We" lead the way?? Close. I wouldn't call a robot part of "we".

More name-calling. How sad, what you've become.

As to the fifty years, well, sci-fi speculated about a lot of interesting things that could be done in orbit with existing technology. Power satellites, medical science breakthroughs, manufacturing processes impossible in earth gravity, food production, life extension technologies, on and on.

Yeah, hopefully someday we can figure out how to make power satellites.

Err...wait ...

Sending a robot all the way to Mars is useless at this point in time

Interesting comment. Now please explain why.

RWGR
08-06-2012, 09:02 PM
The USA's failures, due to corporate greed and incompetance, were a lot more spectacular.



Source?? Link??

How's CASA doing??? :)

RWGR
08-06-2012, 09:03 PM
I think it is obvious that the International Space Station is crucial to human development in space. The idea of an international effort, a human effort, to advance understanding and technology is vital to our future as a planet. Having said that, it becomes critical for key countries to maintain the ability to gain access to that Space Station, so this is where my disconnect with American space policy begins. Right now, Russia is the only country with 'keys to the palace', and this doesn't bode well with me. China is developing an entirely separate space program, with plans for their own space station, and quite frankly, that scares the hell out of me.

So, the Americans should have kept going with a new generation of manned vehicles, rather than the smaller, remote-controlled program they are running now. Just my opinion.

The shuttle program sent numerous people to the space station. In an international effort, the Russians agreed to take on that responsibility.

The Left Sock
08-06-2012, 09:10 PM
I understand all of that, but I still think that if America wants to remain a key player in space exploration and development, they should have maintained the ability to launch people into space, with a rocket program or a shuttle program, of some kind. The fact that China is independently developing this ability, changes the dynamics of everything happening on this front.

Barry Morris
08-06-2012, 09:45 PM
Source?? Link??

How's CASA doing??? :)

Everybody knows about Challenger and Columbia.

As to CASA, that's just silly. Sure the USA has billions to spend, tax dollars all. We don't have those kind of resources. But we do what we can.

We COULD do a per capita assessment, but that would be silly too.

Barry Morris
08-06-2012, 09:50 PM
"We" lead the way?? Close. I wouldn't call a robot part of "we".

More name-calling. How sad, what you've become.

What da heck you talkin' about?? Are YOU a robot?? Duh.


As to the fifty years, well, sci-fi speculated about a lot of interesting things that could be done in orbit with existing technology. Power satellites, medical science breakthroughs, manufacturing processes impossible in earth gravity, food production, life extension technologies, on and on.

Yeah, hopefully someday we can figure out how to make power satellites.

Err...wait ...

Yeah, wait. The USA HAS the tech right now. Too bad the big bucks were wasted securing oil.


Sending a robot all the way to Mars is useless at this point in time

Interesting comment. Now please explain why.

I realize and have said before that all research pays off. But the payoff from any Mars exploration will be decades away at the very best. The items I mentioned would pay off MUCH sooner.

Barry Morris
08-06-2012, 09:52 PM
Trivia. 10,000 square miles of useless desert covered with present technology solar panels would supply ALL the power needs of the USA!!

Barry Morris
08-06-2012, 09:53 PM
I understand all of that, but I still think that if America wants to remain a key player in space exploration and development, they should have maintained the ability to launch people into space, with a rocket program or a shuttle program, of some kind. The fact that China is independently developing this ability, changes the dynamics of everything happening on this front.

I sure hope it scares SOMEBODY in the USA that a very real fundamental enemy has that capability that they do not.

Hans
08-06-2012, 10:40 PM
Trivia. 10,000 square miles of useless desert covered with present technology solar panels would supply ALL the power needs of the USA!!

And that would cost how much? right...

Barry Morris
08-06-2012, 10:59 PM
And that would cost how much? right...

I'll figure it out as soon as I can find out what those panels are worth.

However, I'll bet the bucks going to a war would make a big dent in the cost.

Hans
08-07-2012, 07:17 AM
I don't believe so. Solar panels are DC power, which means it has to be stored in batteries and converted to AC.
You are looking at around 25,000 Terra Watt, which is an incredible figure.
That alone would make it incredibly expensive to use, which is the reason why power generation companies are not using it on a large scale.

Barry Morris
08-07-2012, 09:11 AM
No, it does not. Those rooftop panels attached to the grid do not have batteries.

Hans
08-07-2012, 09:29 PM
That is correct when you are talking about a grid tie system. In that case they use an inverter to convert the DC to AC so it can be fed to the grid.
I was talking about an off-grid system, which uses batteries.

It would not make sense to use a grid tie system to supply all power needs for a country, unless you plan on using electricity during daylight times only...

Barry Morris
08-07-2012, 11:33 PM
It would be interesting to find out what else there is for storing power.

riggs
08-07-2012, 11:46 PM
It would be interesting to find out what else there is for storing power.

Petrochemical companies have far too much power for us to see any serious R&D into future technology. When or if they come across an innovation that can be mass produced at a reasonable cost, they will lose a significant amount of their power. That would obviously be the last thing they and their shareholders would want.

Barry Morris
08-07-2012, 11:48 PM
At current consumption rates, we have enough discovered oil for 30 years.

We better have something in place by then.

riggs
08-07-2012, 11:59 PM
If we're still around, I hope that to be true.

Hans
08-08-2012, 07:05 AM
At current consumption rates, we have enough discovered oil for 30 years.

We better have something in place by then.

Says who?

Hans
08-08-2012, 07:06 AM
It would be interesting to find out what else there is for storing power.

Like what?

Barry Morris
08-08-2012, 09:39 AM
Something as simple as pumping water behind a dam, for use later, is low tech.

Hans
08-09-2012, 07:20 AM
You use more energy to pump the water behind the dam than what the dammed water will provide to you. If not, you would have found an everlasting source of energy.

Barry Morris
08-09-2012, 08:50 AM
You use more energy to pump the water behind the dam than what the dammed water will provide to you. If not, you would have found an everlasting source of energy.

Of course you use more than you receive. That's not the point.

Any excess energy is used to turn the energy into another form, in this case gravity. It is stored as a potential. Energy can take many forms, and since perpetual energy is impossible, there are obviously losses during the transformation.

Hans
08-09-2012, 09:36 PM
So you want to store 25,000 Terra-Watt of energy in a lake?

Barry Morris
08-09-2012, 10:25 PM
I dunno. How many terrawatts are stored behind dams in NorthAmerica now??

And there could be other forms of storage.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_storage

KDawg
08-09-2012, 10:27 PM
What is this? An episode of The Big Bang Theory?

The Left Sock
08-10-2012, 02:04 AM
I dont know, but these guys are completely overlooking the benefit of using dilithium crystals, to boost the signal.

Hans
08-10-2012, 07:12 AM
It's a reality check. Current technology can simply not provide the power we need to replace all "unclean" energy.

The Left Sock
08-10-2012, 09:47 AM
Well, I don't know enough about it, and it seems like a situation specific to the region, but Iceland has solved a great deal of their energy issues using geothermal technology. I imagine it could be utilized elsewhere with some success.

Barry Morris
08-10-2012, 07:07 PM
It's a reality check. Current technology can simply not provide the power we need to replace all "unclean" energy.

Looks like we have about 30 years to figure it out.

Hans
08-10-2012, 09:24 PM
Well, I don't know enough about it, and it seems like a situation specific to the region, but Iceland has solved a great deal of their energy issues using geothermal technology. I imagine it could be utilized elsewhere with some success.

Iceland is a small island, with a limited number of inhabitants. It's a land area that has a very high geothermal activity. So yes, they have a fair amount of geothermal energy that can be harvested with current technology.

Hans
08-10-2012, 09:24 PM
Looks like we have about 30 years to figure it out.

When it comes to storing power, we have made limited progress in the past 100 years. The laws of nature are against us.