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RWGR
12-15-2015, 06:28 PM
Once I began digging deeper into those roots, to learn about where Christianity—my faith—was born I realized, like my tiny Kindergartners, how little I knew.

I was surprised to realize that my Kindergarten students didn’t know where they were born. But, as I thought about it, I was in the exact same position in my faith life. I didn’t know where I came from—where my faith, a central part of my life and identity, had its origins.

Sure, I knew about the Reformation. I knew about the church in the New Testament. I knew, roughly, the outline of history. But I didn’t know the details, and the details are important. I never took the time, or spent the energy, to learn about where (and how) my faith was born.

Blessed John Henry Cardinal Newman, a famous Anglican convert to Catholicism in the 19th century, made a pretty audacious claim about Protestants who read into the history of the Christian Church. He said,

To be deep in history is to cease to be Protestant.

Newman was arguing that those who looked deeply into Church history, the development of the Canon of Scriptures, the development of doctrine, the Fathers of the Church, and the catalysts of the Reformation would cease to be Protestant. The alternative, in his mind, was to become a Catholic.

As I journeyed on this road towards Rome I thought it would be prudent to read some historical texts about the Reformation. After scouring the Internet for suggestions I landed on The Reformation by Diarmaid MacCulloch, a secular Scottish historian of some renown. My goal was to find as unbiased a source as possible covering the Reformation and the Catholic Counter-Reformation from a decent perspective. While MacCulloch’s own social ethics lens certainly coloured some of his commentary, The Reformation was incredibly thorough—and incredibly eye-opening.

I’ve told my Protestant friends this: If I wasn’t already on this journey towards becoming Catholic, after reading MacCulloch’s massive 864-page tome, I would find it very difficult to remain Protestant.

That’s the truth.

Because the truth is, in my reading, the Protestant movement began as a protest. A protest against corruption in the Church and its teachings but also as a product of its time.

The Church was corrupt.

What I failed to grasp as a Protestant was that the Church is the first to admit that.

Here, Protestant theologian, and champion of Church unity Stanley Hauerwas says it best, speaking to modern-day Protestants. He’s worth quoting at length,

Protestantism is a reformed movement. When it becomes an end in itself it becomes unintelligible to itself. Protestants who don’t long for Christian unity are not Protestant. There is also the ongoing problem that Catholics have responded to the Protestant critique in a way that the Protestant critique no longer makes much sense. Accordingly, the question is: why do we continue to be kept apart?

Newman’s argument, however, and Hauerwas brings it home, is that if we look into the reasons why the Reformation took place, the heart of the Reformation, we’d have an awfully hard time hanging on to our current paradigm.

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/albertlittle/a-christianity-without-a-past-a-protestant-deep-in-history/

Barry Morris
12-15-2015, 06:31 PM
Winners don't just cut and paste.

Barry Morris
12-15-2015, 06:32 PM
Interesting quote: "To be deep in history is to cease to be Protestant."

Of course, it's no surprise to me that he didn't say. "To be deep in history is to become a Roman Catholic."

RWGR
12-15-2015, 06:33 PM
I figured you wouldn't take time to read this. It cuts too close to home.

RWGR
12-15-2015, 06:33 PM
Interesting quote: "To be deep in history is to cease to be Protestant."

Of course, it's no surprise to me that he didn't say. "To be deep in history is to become a Roman Catholic."

Ummmm, read the entire story, that's EXACTLY what Newman was saying.

Barry Morris
12-15-2015, 06:34 PM
Oh, and you really think I care what you think?? Thanks for the chuckle!!!

RWGR
12-15-2015, 06:34 PM
Interesting quote: "To be deep in history is to cease to be Protestant."

Of course, it's no surprise to me that he didn't say. "To be deep in history is to become a Roman Catholic."

"Newman was arguing that those who looked deeply into Church history, the development of the Canon of Scriptures, the development of doctrine, the Fathers of the Church, and the catalysts of the Reformation would cease to be Protestant. The alternative, in his mind, was to become a Catholic."

:) :) :)

RWGR
12-15-2015, 06:35 PM
Oh, and you really think I care what you think?? Thanks for the chuckle!!!

If you didn't care, you wouldn't constantly respond

Barry Morris
12-17-2015, 12:21 PM
If you didn't care, you wouldn't constantly respond

Someone has to counter.

RWGR
12-17-2015, 05:40 PM
Someone has to counter.



LOL. you think you are countering???

You respond because I constantly hit nerves and sore spots on you. You can't refute, so you attack.