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View Full Version : Two countries tried to deport him; now he's a suspect in Berlin attack



Hans
12-22-2016, 05:08 PM
Two European countries tried to deport him. He served jail time in one of them.

But Anis Amri never got sent back to his home country of Tunisia.
Now Amri, 24, is a wanted suspect accused of plowing a truck into a Berlin Christmas market, killing 12 people and injuring dozens of others.

Italy and Germany wanted to deport him. So why would Amri still have been in Europe in the first place?

Details are still emerging about Amri's background. But already the case appears to be highlighting an issue that governments around the world face. Deporting someone -- even a criminal convicted of violent offenses -- is harder than it sounds.


The bottom line: In order to deport someone, the person's home country has to cooperate.

In Amri's case, Italian and German officials both say their efforts to deport him ran into roadblocks when it came to getting the documents needed to send him back.


http://www.cnn.com/2016/12/22/europe/berlin-attack-suspect-deportation/index.html

There is nothing difficult about it. You escort him on a plane, land in the main airport of Tunis and hand him over to Tunisian authorities. You simply tell them here he is, and walk way.
You also make sure there is lot's of media presence, and run the story in all major media outlets.
They will take him, trust me.

Anapeg
12-23-2016, 01:37 PM
Two European countries tried to deport him. He served jail time in one of them.

But Anis Amri never got sent back to his home country of Tunisia.
Now Amri, 24, is a wanted suspect accused of ploughing a truck into a Berlin Christmas market, killing 12 people and injuring dozens of others.

Italy and Germany wanted to deport him. So why would Amri still have been in Europe in the first place?

Details are still emerging about Amri's background. But already the case appears to be highlighting an issue that governments around the world face. Deporting someone -- even a criminal convicted of violent offences -- is harder than it sounds.


The bottom line: In order to deport someone, the person's home country has to cooperate.

In Amri's case, Italian and German officials both say their efforts to deport him ran into roadblocks when it came to getting the documents needed to send him back.


http://www.cnn.com/2016/12/22/europe/berlin-attack-suspect-deportation/index.html

There is nothing difficult about it. You escort him on a plane, land in the main airport of Tunis and hand him over to Tunisian authorities. You simply tell them here he is, and walkway.
You also make sure there is lot's of media presence and run the story in all major media outlets.
They will take him, trust me.

Diplomacy causes it's own stumbling blocks. Harsher methods need be employed. You take on it might be a very good starting place and escalate from there.

Barry Morris
01-16-2017, 05:36 PM
Use a parachute.